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Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Renal Function

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00465140
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : April 24, 2007
Last Update Posted : April 24, 2007
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of Sao Paulo

Brief Summary:
Creatine (CR) supplementation is commonly used by athletes. However, its effects on renal function remain controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of creatine supplementation on renal function and oxidative stress in healthy sedentary males (18-35 years old) submitted to exercise training. Our hipothesis is that creatine supplementation does not affect renal function in this population.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Renal Insufficiency Drug: creatine supplementation Behavioral: aerobic exercise training Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
Creatine (CR) supplementation is commonly used by athletes. However, its effects on renal function remain controversial. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of creatine supplementation on renal function and oxidative stress in healthy sedentary males (18-35 years old) submitted to exercise training. Methods: Subjects (n = 18) were randomly divided in two groups and were allocated to receive treatment with either creatine (CR) (~10g • day-1 over three months) or placebo (PL) (dextrose). All subjects undertook moderate intensity aerobic training, in three 40-minute sessions per week, during 3 months. Serum creatinine, TBARS, serum and urinary sodium and potassium were determined at baseline and at the study endpoint. Furthermore, cystatin C was also assessed prior to training (PRE), after 4 (POST 4) and 12 weeks (POST 12). Results: There were decreased in both oxidative stress (evaluated by TBARS - µM/24 h) (PRE CR: 8.2  4.4; PL: 6.4  0.8 vs. POST 12 CR: 2.5  1.8; PL: 2.1  1.6, p=0.0001) and cystatin C levels (mg/L) (PRE CR:0.82  0.09; PL: 0.88  0.07 vs. POST 12 CR: 0.71  0.06; PL: 0.75  0.09, p=0.0001) over the time, suggesting an increase in glomerular filtration rate. There were no significant differences between groups in other renal parameters investigated. Conclusions: These data indicate that high-dose creatine supplementation throughout three months does not provoke renal dysfunction in sedentary healthy males urdergoing aerobic training. Moreover, our results suggest that moderate aerobic training per se could improve renal function.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Enrollment : 18 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Renal Function in Sedentary Healthy Males Urdergoing Aerobic Training: a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial
Study Start Date : January 2004
Actual Study Completion Date : January 2007

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Kidney Tests





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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 35 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Sedentary healthy males,
  • Euthrofic,
  • Age beteween 18-35 y

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Food supplement users,
  • Pre-existing renal dysfunction,
  • Pre-existing cardioavascular disease,
  • Subjetcs physically active or athletes,
  • Obesity,
  • Drugs users

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00465140


Locations
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Brazil
University of Sao Paulo
Sao Paulo, Brazil, 55 11
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Sao Paulo
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Bruno Gualano, ms University of Sao Paulo
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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00465140    
Other Study ID Numbers: EEFEUSP-021284
First Posted: April 24, 2007    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: April 24, 2007
Last Verified: April 2007
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Renal Insufficiency
Kidney Diseases
Urologic Diseases