Working…
COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation.
Get the latest public health information from CDC: https://www.coronavirus.gov.

Get the latest research information from NIH: https://www.nih.gov/coronavirus.
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Efficacy of the Recovery Workbook as a Psychoeducational Tool for Facilitating Recovery

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00375167
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : September 12, 2006
Results First Posted : March 6, 2019
Last Update Posted : March 6, 2019
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Dr. Terry Krupa, Queen's University

Brief Summary:
The present study will determine if Spaniol and colleague's (1994) Recovery Workbook group intervention is an effective clinical tool to move a person with SMI along in their journey of recovery. The primary outcome measurements of this study will be the participants' perceived level of empowerment, hope and optimism, knowledge of recovery, and life satisfaction. This kind of information would add to the current body of knowledge about how principles of recovery can be used in psychoeducational programs used by outpatient community mental health services.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Mental Disorders Behavioral: Recovery Workbook Training (psychoeducational training) Behavioral: ACT as usual Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

ABSTRACT:

Objective: Adopting the principles of recovery into the mental health field has been a growing area for discussion at many different levels of care. The present study will determine if Spaniol and colleague's (1994) Recovery Workbook group intervention can be used as an effective clinical tool to move a person with a severe mental illness along in their journey of recovery. The primary outcome measurements of this study will be the participants' perceived level of empowerment, hope and optimism, knowledge of recovery, and life satisfaction. Method: The study will be a multicenter, prospective, single-blinded, randomized control trial. Sixty participants will be recruited from three Assertive Community Treatment Teams (ACTT) in Kingston, Ontario and individuals will be randomized to either the control or intervention arm of the study. The control arm of the study will receive their regular services from ACTT. The intervention arm will participate in a 10-week psychoeducational group program in addition to receiving their regular services from ACTT. Results: Analysis will be performed by intention to treat, based on total scores of four assessments which will be performed at the trial commencement and termination.

Layout table for study information
Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 33 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Efficacy of the Recovery Workbook as a Psychoeducational Tool for Facilitating Recovery in Persons With Severe and Persistent Mental Illness
Study Start Date : September 2006
Actual Primary Completion Date : January 2007
Actual Study Completion Date : May 2007

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Mental Disorders

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Recovery Workbook Intervention
12-week Recovery Intervention: The intervention is a 12-week group-based intervention. The intervention is informed by the Recovery Workbook- a validated intervention for people with serious mental illness. The intervention includes 2 hour sessions for 12 weeks that focus on the following areas: Introduction to the intervention; Recovery; Knowledge and Control; Managing life stress; Enhancing personal meaning; Building personal support; and Setting personal goals. The total time period of the intervention is 24 hours. Participants in this arm also receive treatment as usual.
Behavioral: Recovery Workbook Training (psychoeducational training)
The Recovery Workbook uses an educational process to increase awareness of recovery, increase knowledge and control of the illness, increase awareness of the importance and nature of stress, enhance personal meaning, build personal support, and develop goals and plans of action. The intervention period of 30 weekly sessions recommended by Spaniol and colleagues was shortened to 12 weekly sessions to accommodate for clinical and participant commitment. No workbook content was excluded, and all practice exercises were covered.

Behavioral: ACT as usual
Assertive Community Treatment services provided as per established and evidence-based fidelity standards.

No Intervention: Treatment as usual
The participants in the control arm will continue to receive treatment as usual. TAU is Assertive Community Treatment. Assertive Community Treatments are structured to meet set fidelity standards that are evidence-based. This arm did not receive any intervention.



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Hope Herth Index [ Time Frame: Within 3 days of completion of intervention ]
    The Herth Hope Index was used to gather information about participants' level of hopefulness. The 12-item scale is easily administered and has been used with persons with serious mental illness . It is a self-report tool, and respondents answer on a 4-point agreement scale that ranges from "strongly disagree" to "strongly agree". The scoring range is from 12-48 with a higher score indicating higher levels of hope. The scale has been shown to have an alpha coefficient of .97 and a test-retest reliability of .91 within two weeks. Criterion-related validity has also been supported by high correlations (.81-.92) with instruments measuring the same construct.

  2. Empowerment Scale [ Time Frame: Within 3 days of completion of interventions ]
    The construct measured is empowerment. The Empowerment Scale is a self-reported measure that contains 28 statements about empowerment to which participants respond on a 4-point agreement scale. Scoring range is 28-112, with a lower score indicating higher empowerment. Studies have demonstrated the scale's high internal consistency ({alpha}=.85-.90) and good reliability ({alpha}>.60) and validity (28,31,32).

  3. Recovery Assessment Scale [ Time Frame: Within 3 days of completion of intervention ]
    The construct is Personal Recovery, defined as a person's ability to live a full and meaningful life. The Recovery Assessment Scale (RAS) has 41-items and uses a 5-point agreement scale, and a total score is used, with scores ranging from 41-205, with a higher score indicating a higher sense of personal recovery. The RAS also has 5 subscales (see below). Subscales are added to produce a total score. Domain 1 is Confidence and Hope. he scoring range here is 9-45, where a higher score indicating higher recovery. Domain 2 is Willingness to Ask for Help. Scoring range is 3-15. Domain 3: Ability rely on others: Scoring range 5-25. Domain 4 Symptoms: Scoring range 4-20. Domain 5: Goal and Success Orientation: Scoring range 3-15. For each domain, higher values represent a better outcome.

  4. Quality of Life Index, General Version [ Time Frame: Within 3 days of completion of intervention ]
    The Quality of Life Index, General Version (37), is a 33-item self-report scale measuring satisfaction with and importance of aspects of life. It includes four subscales: health and functioning, socioeconomic status, psychological status, and significant others. Satisfaction and importance are measured on a 6-point agreement scale. A high score indicates higher quality of life. Full scoring instructions and computer algorithm is available at http://qli.org.uic.edu/questionaires/pdf/genericversionIII/genericscoring.pdf. Importance ratings are used to weight satisfaction responses so that scores reflect satisfaction with aspects of life that are valued by the individual (37). For internal consistency and reliability, Cronbach's alpha is .92 for the entire tool and .88, .75, .80, and .68, respectively, for the subscales (37). Possible range for the final scores = 0 to 30, where a higher value represents a better outcome..



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Layout table for eligibility information
Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Receive support from an Assertive Community Treatment Team.
  2. Meet the DSM-IV diagnostic classification for schizophrenia, schizoaffective, schizophreniform, delusional disorder, or bipolar disorder.
  3. Aged 18-55 years-old.
  4. Individuals agree to participate in the study after they have been informed of all the expected benefits and risks.
  5. Neither substance misuse nor organic disorder judged to be the major cause of psychotic symptoms.

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Inability to give informed consent
  2. Diagnosis of dementia
  3. Significant head injury or other brain injury leading to cognitive impairment
  4. Mental retardation (premorbid IQ < 65)
  5. Require an interpreter

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00375167


Locations
Layout table for location information
Canada, Ontario
Queen's University
Kingston, Ontario, Canada, K7L 3N6
Sponsors and Collaborators
Queen's University
Investigators
Layout table for investigator information
Principal Investigator: Skye Barbic, BScOT Queen's University
Principal Investigator: Terry Krupa, PhD Queen's University
Layout table for additonal information
Responsible Party: Dr. Terry Krupa, Principal Investigator, Queen's University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00375167    
Other Study ID Numbers: 1
First Posted: September 12, 2006    Key Record Dates
Results First Posted: March 6, 2019
Last Update Posted: March 6, 2019
Last Verified: November 2018
Keywords provided by Dr. Terry Krupa, Queen's University:
Recovery, Hope, Empowerment, Randomized Control Trial
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Layout table for MeSH terms
Mental Disorders