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Ultrasound Scanning of Vascular Access Sites

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00330837
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : May 29, 2006
Last Update Posted : February 15, 2008
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of Pittsburgh

Brief Summary:

Inadvertent puncture of an unintended object in a vascular access procedure is common and can lead to serious consequences. Inadvertent common carotid artery (CCA) puncture while targeting the internal jugular vein (IJV), for example, is reported to have an incidence of 2% - 8% and usually results in localized hematoma formation. The hematoma may enlarge rapidly if the patient is coagulopathic, or if a large puncture wound is produced by the introduction of the sheath itself into the CCA. Airway obstruction, pseudoaneurysm, arterio-venous fistula formation and retrograde aortic dissection have all been reported as a consequence of CCA puncture. In the presence of occlusive (atheromatous) carotid disease, inadvertent puncture may carry the risk of precipitating a cerebrovascular accident.

In this study, we aim to collect color Doppler and B-mode ultrasound videos from the most common ultrasound-guided vascular access sites - internal jugular vein, subclavian vein, femoral vein, basilic vein, and brachial vein. The videos will also include structures in close proximity to the intended veins. Using such database, we will run various vessel tracking and identification algorithms to evaluate their performance. Our ultimate goal is to develop an algorithm that will aid the ultrasound operator in identifying structures and differentiating between arteries and veins.


Condition or disease
Catheterization, Central Venous Ultrasonography

Detailed Description:

Inadvertent puncture of an unintended object in a vascular access procedure is common and can lead to serious consequences. Inadvertent common carotid artery (CCA) puncture while targeting the internal jugular vein (IJV), for example, is reported to have an incidence of 2% - 8% and usually results in localized hematoma formation. The hematoma may enlarge rapidly if the patient is coagulopathic, or if a large puncture wound is produced by the introduction of the sheath itself into the CCA. Airway obstruction, pseudoaneurysm, arterio-venous fistula formation and retrograde aortic dissection have all been reported as a consequence of CCA puncture. In the presence of occlusive (atheromatous) carotid disease, inadvertent puncture may carry the risk of precipitating a cerebrovascular accident.

In this study, we aim to collect color Doppler and B-mode ultrasound videos from the most common ultrasound-guided vascular access sites - internal jugular vein, subclavian vein, femoral vein, basilic vein, and brachial vein. The videos will also include structures in close proximity to the intended veins. Using such database, we will run various vessel tracking and identification algorithms to evaluate their performance. Our ultimate goal is to develop an algorithm that will aid the ultrasound operator in identifying structures and differentiating between arteries and veins.

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Study Type : Observational
Estimated Enrollment : 100 participants
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Ultrasound Scanning of Vascular Access Sites
Study Start Date : February 2006
Actual Study Completion Date : February 2007

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Ultrasound





Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • The subjects will be any person age 18 and older who can legally consent to being scanned by ultrasound

Exclusion Criteria:

  • No exclusion criteria shall be based on race, ethnicity, gender, pregnancy status, or HIV status

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00330837


Locations
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United States, Pennsylvania
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States, 15261
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Pittsburgh
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: George Stetten, MD/PhD University of Pittsburgh, Dept of Bioengineering
Publications:
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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00330837    
Other Study ID Numbers: 0512116
First Posted: May 29, 2006    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 15, 2008
Last Verified: February 2008