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Stepped Care for Mandated College Students

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00247182
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : November 1, 2005
Last Update Posted : September 21, 2016
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Brian Borsari, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)

Brief Summary:
This project provides stepped care to college students mandated for alcohol-related offenses. Students are first provided with a minimal intervention, a 15-minute discussion of their alcohol use. Students who continue to drink in a risky manner are provided with a more intensive, hour-long brief motivational interview. By providing more intensive treatment to the students who exhibit risky drinking, we hope to maximize the efficiency of campus alcohol programs.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Alcohol Use Behavioral: Step 1: Minimal Intervention Behavioral: Step 2: Brief Motivational Intervention Behavioral: Alcohol Assessment Phase 1

Detailed Description:

Colleges and universities have seen a large increase in the number of students referred to the administration for the violation of alcohol policies. However, research indicates that the majority of mandated students may not require extensive treatment. Stepped care assigns individuals to different levels of care according to their response to treatment. Encouraging research indicates that minimal interventions and BMIs may reduce heavy drinking in mandated college students. Thus, implementing stepped care using these interventions could maximize treatment efficiency and reduce the demands on campus alcohol programs.

Participants will be students mandated to attend an alcohol program at a northeastern private university. All participants will receive Step 1, a 15-minute minimal intervention including a discussion of the referral incident and the provision of a booklet containing advice to reduce drinking. Participants will be assessed six weeks later, and those continuing to exhibit risky alcohol use will receive Step 2, randomization to: (a) a 60-90 minute brief motivational intervention (BMI) or (b) an assessment-only control. All students will complete 3, 6, and 9 month follow-up assessments. The three groups will be compared on two outcome measures: frequency of binge drinking episodes and alcohol-related problems in the past 30 days. Predictors of treatment response (readiness to change, alcohol expectancies, age of first drink, sensation seeking, descriptive norms, and reaction to the referral) will also be evaluated for both steps of the intervention. Research findings will assist college alcohol programs in determining the most effective and efficient allocation of their limited resources in treating mandated students. The long-term objectives of this research are to inform preventive intervention research about the utility and cost-effectiveness of stepped-care approaches and to identify individual and situational factors that qualify these effects.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 598 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Factorial Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Stepped Care for Mandated College Students
Study Start Date : October 2006
Actual Primary Completion Date : April 2010
Actual Study Completion Date : June 2011

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Alcohol

Arm Intervention/treatment
Step 1
Minimal Intervention
Behavioral: Step 1: Minimal Intervention
All participants will receive Step 1, a 15-minute minimal intervention including a discussion of the referral incident and the provision of a booklet containing advice to reduce drinking. Participants will be assessed six weeks later. All students will complete 3, 6, and 9 month follow-up assessments

Behavioral: Step 2: Brief Motivational Intervention
Participants continuing to exhibit risky alcohol use will receive Step 2, randomization to: (a) a 60-90 minute brief motivational intervention (BMI) or (b) an assessment-only control. All students will complete 3, 6, and 9 month follow-up assessments.

Active Comparator: Step 2-A
Brief motivational intervention (BMI)
Behavioral: Step 2: Brief Motivational Intervention
Participants continuing to exhibit risky alcohol use will receive Step 2, randomization to: (a) a 60-90 minute brief motivational intervention (BMI) or (b) an assessment-only control. All students will complete 3, 6, and 9 month follow-up assessments.

Active Comparator: Step 2-B
Assessment-only control
Behavioral: Alcohol Assessment
Participants continuing to exhibit risky alcohol use will receive Step 2, randomization to: (a) a 60-90 minute brief motivational intervention (BMI) or (b) an assessment-only control. All students will complete 3, 6, and 9 month follow-up assessments.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Alcohol consumption [ Time Frame: 3, 6, and 9 months ]
  2. Alcohol-related consequences [ Time Frame: 3, 6, and 9 months ]

Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Predictors of response to treatment [ Time Frame: 3, 6, and 9 months ]


Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Male and female students 18 years of age or older.
  • Participants will have signed a witnessed informed consent.
  • Participants will have been referred for an alcohol-related offense

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Participants who meet current DSM-IV criteria for substance use disorder
  • Participants who are currently in treatment for substance use.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00247182


Locations
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United States, Rhode Island
Roger Williams University
Bristol, Rhode Island, United States, 02809
Sponsors and Collaborators
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Brian E. Borsari, PhD Brown University

Additional Information:
Publications of Results:

Other Publications:
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Brian Borsari, PI, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00247182    
Other Study ID Numbers: NIAAABOR015518
NIH Grant R01 AA015518-01
First Posted: November 1, 2005    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: September 21, 2016
Last Verified: September 2016
Keywords provided by Brian Borsari, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA):
Stepped Care
Brief Motivational Intervention
Minimal Intervention
Treatment response
College Students
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Alcohol Drinking
Drinking Behavior
Ethanol
Anti-Infective Agents, Local
Anti-Infective Agents
Central Nervous System Depressants
Physiological Effects of Drugs