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Areas of Brain Responsible for Understanding American Sign Language

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00001782
First Posted: December 10, 2002
Last Update Posted: March 4, 2008
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
  Purpose

The human brain is made up of two halves called hemispheres. Each half of the brain is responsible for processing different kinds of information. Previous neuroimaging studies have shown that both the right and left hemispheres are involved when processing information given in American Sign Language (ASL). However, the study also showed that when processing spoken language, the left hemisphere was mostly involved.

Researchers would like to find out more about how the brain processes American Sign Language (ASL). This study is designed to determine if the right hemisphere is necessary for normal understanding of ASL.


Condition
Brain Mapping Deafness Healthy

Study Type: Observational
Official Title: Hemispheric Lateralization of Language Receptive Function in the Deaf and in Hearing Individuals Who Learned ASL as First Language

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):

Estimated Enrollment: 30
Study Start Date: March 1998
Estimated Study Completion Date: December 2000
Detailed Description:
The purpose of this protocol is to determine if the right hemisphere activation associated with perception of American Sign Language (ASL) in deaf subjects and in normal hearing individuals raised by deaf parents (who learned ASL before written English) is necessary for appropriate understanding of ASL.
  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Senior
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Subject age between 18 and 65 years.

Adult hearing offsprings of deaf parents.

Congenitally deaf individuals.

Intact hearing volunteers.

No subjects with personal or family history of seizures or other neurological or demyelinating disorders.

No pregnant women tested after urine pregnancy test.

No subjects with severe coronary disease.

No subjects with metal in the cranium except mouth.

No subjects with intracardiac lines and implanted medication pumps.

No subjects with increased intracranial pressure as evaluated by clinical means.

No subjects with cardiac pacemakers.

No subjects with an intake of neuroleptics.

  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00001782


Locations
United States, Maryland
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Bethesda, Maryland, United States, 20892
Sponsors and Collaborators
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
  More Information

Publications:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00001782     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 980082
98-N-0082
First Submitted: November 3, 1999
First Posted: December 10, 2002
Last Update Posted: March 4, 2008
Last Verified: November 1999

Keywords provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):
Deafness
Hemisphere Dominance
Language
Plasticity
Speech
rTMS

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Deafness
Hearing Loss
Hearing Disorders
Ear Diseases
Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases
Sensation Disorders
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms