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Survey of the Use of Alternative Medical Therapies in Adult Cancer Patients Enrolled in Phase I Clinical Trials

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00001695
First Posted: November 4, 1999
Last Update Posted: March 4, 2008
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
  Purpose
Simultaneous use of alternative or complementary medical therapies by cancer patients undergoing conventional medical treatment is extremely common and may not always be disclosed to the patient's treating physician. Cancer patients undergoing Phase I therapy on clinical trials constitute a special population of patients, since by definition, their prescribed therapy is scientifically unproven in terms of efficacy. Phase I patients are closely monitored for adverse effects in order to identify and characterize the toxicities and to define a tolerable dose of their experimental treatment. Thus, the unrecognized use of alternative therapies by patients actively enrolled in phase I trials may potentially confound rational drug development by causing adverse side effects or by contributing to drug interactions. Examples of clinical toxicities induced by alternative medical treatments include liver dysfunction or renal failure caused by herbal preparations, or hematologic abnormalities, such as eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome caused by tryptophan food supplements. Therefore, it is important to document and determine the prevalence of alternative therapy use in this specific patient population; however, this issue has not previously been examined in a scientifically rigorous manner. We propose to conduct a survey and interview study of phase I cancer patients enrolled in ongoing clinical trials at the National Cancer Institute to determine the prevalence of alternative therapy use in this population. This study will also examine patient attitudes and perceptions regarding their use of alternative therapy as compared with their scientifically-sanctioned phase I experimental therapy. This information has important implications for drug development.

Condition
Neoplasm

Study Type: Observational
Official Title: Survey of the Use of Alternative Medical Therapies in Adult Cancer Patients Enrolled in Phase I Clinical Trials

Further study details as provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):

Estimated Enrollment: 125
Study Start Date: April 1998
Estimated Study Completion Date: January 2002
Detailed Description:
Simultaneous use of alternative or complementary medical therapies by cancer patients undergoing conventional medical treatment is extremely common and may not always be disclosed to the patient's treating physician. Cancer patients undergoing Phase I therapy on clinical trials constitute a special population of patients, since by definition, their prescribed therapy is scientifically unproven in terms of efficacy. Phase I patients are closely monitored for adverse effects in order to identify and characterize the toxicities and to define a tolerable dose of their experimental treatment. Thus, the unrecognized use of alternative therapies by patients actively enrolled in phase I trials may potentially confound rational drug development by causing adverse side effects or by contributing to drug interactions. Examples of clinical toxicities induced by alternative medical treatments include liver dysfunction or renal failure caused by herbal preparations, or hematologic abnormalities, such as eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome caused by tryptophan food supplements. Therefore, it is important to document and determine the prevalence of alternative therapy use in this specific patient population; however, this issue has not previously been examined in a scientifically rigorous manner. We propose to conduct a survey and interview study of phase I cancer patients enrolled in ongoing clinical trials at the National Cancer Institute to determine the prevalence of alternative therapy use in this population. This study will also examine patient attitudes and perceptions regarding their use of alternative therapy as compared with their scientifically-sanctioned phase I experimental therapy. This information has important implications for drug development.
  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Senior
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Patients must be registered and actively participating in a Phase I clinical trial in the Division of Hematology/Oncology, National Naval Medical Center.

Patients must be able to give signed, informed consent.

Patients must be greater than or equal to 18 years old.

Patients must be medically well enough to be interviewed and to fill out the study questionnaire.

Patients must not have been previously enrolled in this study.

  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT00001695


Locations
United States, Maryland
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Bethesda, Maryland, United States, 20892
Sponsors and Collaborators
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
  More Information

Publications:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00001695     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 980098
98-C-0098
First Submitted: November 3, 1999
First Posted: November 4, 1999
Last Update Posted: March 4, 2008
Last Verified: January 2002

Keywords provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):
Complementary Medicine
Unproven Treatments
Herbal