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History of Changes for Study: NCT02618174
Enhanced Broccoli Consumption After a Liking Norm and Vegetable Variety Message: Effects After a 24 Hour Delay.
Latest version (submitted November 27, 2015) on ClinicalTrials.gov
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Study Record Versions
Version A B Submitted Date Changes
1 November 27, 2015 None (earliest Version on record)
Comparison Format:

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Study NCT02618174
Submitted Date:  November 27, 2015 (v1)

Open or close this module Study Identification
Unique Protocol ID: UBirmingham-SNS1
Brief Title: Enhanced Broccoli Consumption After a Liking Norm and Vegetable Variety Message: Effects After a 24 Hour Delay.
Official Title: Enhanced Broccoli Consumption After a Liking Norm and Vegetable Variety Message: Effects After a 24 Hour Delay.
Secondary IDs:
Open or close this module Study Status
Record Verification: November 2015
Overall Status: Completed
Study Start: October 2013
Primary Completion: July 2014 [Actual]
Study Completion: July 2014 [Actual]
First Submitted: November 24, 2015
First Submitted that
Met QC Criteria:
November 27, 2015
First Posted: December 1, 2015 [Estimate]
Last Update Submitted that
Met QC Criteria:
November 27, 2015
Last Update Posted: December 1, 2015 [Estimate]
Open or close this module Sponsor/Collaborators
Sponsor: University of Birmingham
Responsible Party: Sponsor
Collaborators: Economic and Social Research Council, United Kingdom
Open or close this module Oversight
U.S. FDA-regulated Drug:
U.S. FDA-regulated Device:
Data Monitoring: No
Open or close this module Study Description
Brief Summary: Encouraging individuals to eat vegetables is difficult. However, recent evidence suggests that using social-based information might help. For instance, it has been shown that if people think that others are eating lots of fruit and vegetables, that they will consume more of these foods to match the 'norm'. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a liking social norm (information about how much others like vegetables) would be effective at encouraging people to eat more vegetables and to examine whether these effects are sustained beyond initial exposure (i.e. whether the effect of the norm persists on food selection 24 hours alter).
Detailed Description:

Using a 2 x 5 x 2 experimental design we investigated the effects of exposure to various messages on later food intake and whether any effects were sustained 24 hours after exposure in both low and high consumers of vegetables. There were three factors of delay (immediate food selection versus food selection 24 hours after exposure), message type (liking norm, descriptive norm, health message, food-based control, and neutral control message) and habitual consumption (low versus high). The buffet consisted of three raw vegetables, three energy-dense foods and two dips.

In this study the investigators hypothesised that a liking norm would increase the consumption of vegetables (compared to a neutral control condition) and that the effect would persist on vegetable consumption 24 hours after intital exposure to the liking norm.

Open or close this module Conditions
Conditions: Eating Behaviour
Keywords:
Open or close this module Study Design
Study Type: Interventional
Primary Purpose: Other
Study Phase: Not Applicable
Interventional Study Model: Parallel Assignment
Number of Arms: 5
Masking: Single (Participant)
Allocation: Randomized
Enrollment: 400 [Actual]
Open or close this module Arms and Interventions
Arms Assigned Interventions
Placebo Comparator: Neutral Control Condition
Message about age of University of Birmingham
Behavioral: Neutral Control Condition
Message about age of University of Birmingham
Placebo Comparator: Food-based Control Condition
Message about variety of vegetables in the world
Behavioral: Food-based Control Condition
Message about variety of vegetables in the world
Active Comparator: Health Condition
Message about the health benefits of eating vegetables
Behavioral: Health Condition
Message about the health benefits of eating vegetables
Active Comparator: Descriptive Social Norm
Message suggesting most people eat plenty of vegetables
Behavioral: Descriptive Social Norm
Message suggesting most people eat plenty of vegetables
Experimental: Liking Social Norm
Message suggesting most people like eating vegetables
Behavioral: Liking Social Norm
Message suggesting most people like eating vegetables
Open or close this module Outcome Measures
Primary Outcome Measures:
1. Grams of vegetables consumed
[ Time Frame: 8 months ]

Open or close this module Eligibility
Minimum Age: 18 Years
Maximum Age: 65 Years
Sex: All
Gender Based:
Accepts Healthy Volunteers: Yes
Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy volunteers
  • Sufficiently fluent in English

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Smokers
  • Diabetes
  • Food allergies
  • Past / present depression or anxiety
  • Past / present eating disorder.
Open or close this module Contacts/Locations
Study Officials: Jason M Thomas, PhD
Principal Investigator
University of Birmingham
Locations: United Kingdom, West Midlands
University of Birmingham
Birmingham, West Midlands, United Kingdom, B15 2TT
Open or close this module IPDSharing
Plan to Share IPD:
Open or close this module References
Links:
Available IPD/Information:

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U.S. National Library of Medicine | U.S. National Institutes of Health | U.S. Department of Health & Human Services