Psychological Group Intervention to Reduce Stress and Burnout Among Cardiac Intensive Care Nurses

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified August 2011 by Meir Medical Center.
Recruitment status was  Not yet recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Meir Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01412775
First received: May 2, 2011
Last updated: August 29, 2011
Last verified: August 2011
  Purpose

The study will examine the influence of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) short-term group intervention program on the levels of psychological stress and professional exhaustion experienced by the nursing staff in a cardiac department.


Condition Intervention
Stress, Psychological
Behavioral: short-term group intervention program

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Subject)
Primary Purpose: Supportive Care
Official Title: The Contribution of a Short-term Psychological Group Intervention to Reduce Stress and Burnout Among Cardiac Intensive Care Nurses: A Pilot Study

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Meir Medical Center:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Symptoms of psychological stress [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The Nursing Stress Scale (NSS) has been shown to be a valid and reliable instrument to assess occupational stressors among nurses.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Exhaustion levels [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Nurse's burnout symptoms: The SMBS questionnaire (Shirom-Melamed Burnout), will be used.This questionnaire reflects the participant's exhaustion in their workplace.


Estimated Enrollment: 24
Study Start Date: August 2011
Estimated Study Completion Date: July 2012
Estimated Primary Completion Date: July 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Psychological stress and exhaustion
Twenty four male and female nurses from the cardiac intensive-care unit (CCU) of Meir Hospital, who consent to take part in the offered intervention program, will participate in the study. The participants will be randomly assigned to an experiment group of 12 participants and a control group of 12 participants.
Behavioral: short-term group intervention program

The intervention will include three aspects: Psycho-educational intervention: attending a lecture about stress and exhaustion; Techniques for decreasing stress: experiencing relaxation techniques and guided imagery and a BALINT style group:analyzing actual work cases and cognitive-behavioral focusing for reframing thoughts and making them more adaptive, expressing emotions and training for more appropriate behaviors.

The study includes three weekly sessions, Each session will be 90 minutes in duration.

Other Names:
  • intervention program
  • short-term group intervention

  Hide Detailed Description

Detailed Description:

Exhaustion typifies a wide variety of professions, but it is especially evident in the service and aid professions (e.g., teaching and medicine), and nurses in particular are reported to be among the most exhausted. Exhaustion is described as nursing's "professional cancer", and stress is one of the major sources leading to it.

Articles and studies referring to stress among nurses in the years 1980-1996 mapped out six sources of stress stemming from inner sources related to the employee and those stemming from hospital organization: stress that stems from work patterns and overload (such as blurring, lack of clarity, lack of control and coping with death); interpersonal relationships at work (conflicts with other employees and with the medical staff); relationships with patients and their families (insufficient preparation for coping with the emotional needs of patients and their families); work organization and management (for example, lack of staff support and staff shortages); aspects related to the nursing profession (concerns regarding the treatment and care received by the patient), as well as concerns regarding the employee's practical knowledge and skills.

Since stress can lead, among other things, to functional exhaustion and dissatisfaction at work, and since studies have shown that stress has direct and indirect effects on the quality of patient care, it is important to find ways to decrease stress and the resulting exhaustion. Such efforts will increase nurses' efficiency at work and will also improve their quality of life, not to mention that of the patients. Therefore, the current study will examine the effectiveness of a short-term group intervention program for the nursing staff of a hospital's cardiac intensive-care unit.

There are a number of ways to decrease stress which vary both in the theory behind them ( the cognitive approach, for instance, explains the source of stress as stemming from cognitive and behavioral patterns acquired during one's life whereas the dynamic approach relates to deep and unconscious layers of the mind), and in their nature (the way in which they're facilitated). Researchers who have examined the relative efficacy of the different intervention programs in decreasing stress found that cognitive therapy is the most effective approach. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) can be applied both as individual therapy and as group therapy. According to the researchers, interventions in a group setting have several advantages over individual CBT: creating open relationships between staff members, giving participants an opportunity to get to know one another, providing a platform where employees can express their feelings, developing a sincere support group which proves crucial during stressful work situations, forging a feeling of belonging, and creative solving of shared conflicts and financial issues.

The current study will examine the influence of a CBT short-term group intervention program on the levels of psychological stress and professional exhaustion experienced by the nursing staff in a cardiac department.

The goal of the study:

The current study will examine the effectiveness of a short-term group intervention program for the nursing staff of a hospital's cardiac intensive-care unit. The intervention will include three aspects:

  1. Psycho-educational intervention: attending a lecture about stress and exhaustion.
  2. Techniques for decreasing stress: experiencing relaxation techniques and guided imagery.
  3. A BALINT style group: analyzing actual work cases and cognitive-behavioral focusing for reframing thoughts and making them more adaptive, expressing emotions and training for more appropriate behaviors.

The study, which includes three weekly sessions, assumes that the intervention program will help to significantly decrease the participants' levels of psychological stress and professional exhaustion in comparison with their state before participation in the program, and also in comparison with those who didn't take part in the program (i.e., the control group).

The hypotheses of the study:

  1. Participation in the intervention program will be related to decreased levels of psychological stress. The nursing staff in the program will demonstrate a lower level of negative psychological affect after participation. The level of stress will decrease significantly in comparison with the participants' state in the beginning of the program, and in comparison with professionals who didn't participate in the program (the control group).
  2. Participation in the program will be related to reduced exhaustion levels: the nursing staff members who participate in the program will report lower exhaustion levels than they reported before the program, and in comparison with the control group (members of the nursing staff who didn't participate in the intervention program).
  Eligibility

Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Nurses from the cardiac intensive-care unit (CCU) of Meir Hospital, who consent to take part in the offered intervention program

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Refusal to participate
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01412775

Contacts
Contact: Morris Mosseri, Professor 972-9-7472587 Morris.Mosseri@clalit.org.il
Contact: Noa Vilchinsky, Ph.D 972-3-531-8601 noav18@inter.net.il

Locations
Israel
Department of Cardiology, Meir Medical Center Not yet recruiting
Kefar Saba, Israel
Contact: Morris Mosseri, Professor    972-9-7472587    Morris.Mosseri@clalit.org.il   
Contact: Noa Vilchinsky, Ph.D    972-3-531-8601    noav18@inter.net.il   
Principal Investigator: Morris Mosseri, Professor         
Sponsors and Collaborators
Meir Medical Center
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Morris Mosseri, Professor Department of Cardiology, Meir Medical Center, Israel
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Meir Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01412775     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: MMC11XXX-XXCTIL
Study First Received: May 2, 2011
Last Updated: August 29, 2011
Health Authority: Israel: Clalit Health Services

Keywords provided by Meir Medical Center:
stress
burnout
exhaustion

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Stress, Psychological
Behavioral Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 23, 2014