Optimization of Treatment and Management of Schizophrenia in Europe (OPTIMISE)

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified March 2014 by UMC Utrecht
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
King's College London
Technische Universität München
University of Manchester
Ludwig-Maximilians - University of Munich
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Rene Kahn, UMC Utrecht
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01248195
First received: October 20, 2010
Last updated: March 12, 2014
Last verified: March 2014
  Purpose

The purpose of the study is optimising current treatments in schizophrenia and explore novel therapeutic options for schizophrenia. The study intends to both address basic, but so far unanswered, questions in the treatment of schizophrenia and develop new interventions. It is expected that the project will lead to evidence that is directly applicable to treatment guidelines, and will identify potential mechanisms for new drug development.


Condition Intervention Phase
Schizophrenia
Schizophreniform Disorder
Schizoaffective Disorder
Drug: Amisulpride open label
Drug: 6-week amisulpride double blind treatment
Drug: 6-week olanzapine double blind treatment
Drug: 12-week clozapine open-label treatment
Behavioral: Psychosocial intervention
Phase 4

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Caregiver, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Optimization of Treatment and Management of Schizophrenia in Europe

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by UMC Utrecht:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • PANSS [ Time Frame: Jan 2016 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Study consists of multiple components, each with their own objectives. For this (medication) component: number of patients in remission, based on PANSS scores (criteria of Andreasen et al.; 2005) after 4 weeks open label amisulpride, after 6 weeks double blind amisulpride or olanzapine and after 12 weeks of open label clozapine.

  • Sellwood rating scale [ Time Frame: Jan 2016 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Psychosocial intervention component, objective A: drug adherence rates as a function of (standardized self report and) Sellwood rating scales after 12 and 52 weeks.

  • Biological profile [ Time Frame: jan 2016 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Biological predictors component, objective A: drug response (remission vs non-remission) as a function of biological profile, after 4 weeks, 10 weeks and 22 weeks (after each medication phase).

  • MRS measures [ Time Frame: jan 2016 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Biological predictors component, objective B: using MRS scans, differences between responders and non-responders in regional glutamate levels a) at baseline and b) between baseline and after one month of treatment with amisulpiride.

  • SOFAS global functioning [ Time Frame: jan 2016 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Psychosocial intervention component, objective B: drug adherence rates as a function of standardized global functioning (SOFAS score after 1 year) following psychosocial intervention vs treatment as usual.

  • MRI assessments [ Time Frame: jan 2016 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    MRI component objective: the percentage of first episode patients that show radiological abnormalities suggestive of neurological disorders which may explain the occurrence of psychotic symptoms - measurement at baseline only.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • All cause treatment discontinuation [ Time Frame: jan 2016 ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]

    The different components of the study have their own secondary objectives:

    Medication component has multiple secondary objectives, most important one is all-cause treatment discontinuation after 4 weeks, 10 weeks and 22 weeks. Number and reason for premature discontinuations (treatment discontinuation) of the amisulpride and the olanzapine group will be compared (after 10 weeks).


  • All cause discontinuation [ Time Frame: jan 2016 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Psychosocial intervention component has multiple secondary objectives, most important one is all-cause treatment discontinuation between treatment groups after 12 and 52 weeks.

  • Biological markers [ Time Frame: jan 2016 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Biological predictors component has multiple secondary objectives, most important one is the ability of biological markers to predict response to antipsychotic and treatment tolerability in schizophrenia, after 4, 10 and 22 weeks.

  • MRI assessments [ Time Frame: jan 2016 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The ability of MRI to predict response to antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia, after 4, 10 and 22 weeks.


Estimated Enrollment: 350
Study Start Date: May 2011
Estimated Study Completion Date: January 2016
Estimated Primary Completion Date: January 2016 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Phase I: 1 arm 'amisulpride open label'
For 4 weeks, all patients will be treated with amisulpride open label.
Drug: Amisulpride open label
4-week open label amisulpride treatment
Active Comparator: Phase II: 'amisulpride double blind'
Patients who do not meet remission criteria during phase I (4 weeks open label amisulpride), flow to phase II where they are randomised to 1 of 2 6-week double blind treatment arms, one of which is 'amisulpride double blind'
Drug: 6-week amisulpride double blind treatment
6-week amisulpride double blind treatment
Active Comparator: Phase II 'olanzapine double blind'
Patients who do not meet remission criteria during phase I (4 weeks open label amisulpride), flow to phase II where they are randomised to 1 of 2 6-week double blind treatment arms, one of which is 'olanzapine double blind'
Drug: 6-week olanzapine double blind treatment
6-week olanzapine double blind treatment
Phase III: 1 arm 'clozapine open label'
Patients who do not meet remission criteria during phase II (6-week double blind amisulpride vs olanzapine), flow to phase III, where only 1 arm is available: 'clozapine open label'
Drug: 12-week clozapine open-label treatment
12-week clozapine open-label treatment
Experimental: Psychosocial intervention
Patients who meet remission criteria during any of the phases of the medication component, patients who drop out of the medication component and patients who did not meet remission criteria at the end of the medication component, will flow to the psychosocial intervention component, where they are randomised to 1 of 2 arms, one of which is the 'Psychosocial Intervention' arm.
Behavioral: Psychosocial intervention
Psychosocial intervention
No Intervention: Psychosocial Intervention phase: 'TAU'
Patients who meet remission criteria during any of the phases of the medication component, patients who drop out of the medication component and patients who did not meet remission criteria at the end of the medication component, will flow to the psychosocial intervention component, where they are randomised to 1 of 2 arms, one of which is the 'Treatment as usual' arm.

Detailed Description:

Despite nearly fifty years of pharmacological and psychosocial research, the overall prognosis of schizophrenia has improved only marginally. While the efficacy of most antipsychotic medication is generally uncontested, their overall functional impact has been modest. In order to improve this unsatisfactory result, this study aims to optimize current treatments in schizophrenia and explore novel therapeutic options for schizophrenia. The study comprises a medication intervention component, a psychosocial intervention component, a biological predictor component and an MRI component. MRI assessments are performed at baseline, and used to determine whether potential organic causes for psychotic symptoms are present, and to test prospective value of these assessments for subsequent treatment response. MRI assessments of healthy volunteers will be included to test for deviations in patients' assessments; these volunteers will not participate in any other protocol procedure. The medication intervention component comprises a first 4-week phase of amisulpride treatment. Non-responders will subsequently be randomised to a 6-week double blind phase on either amisulpride or olanzapine. Patients who classify as non-responders at the end of this phase, a 12-week open label treatment with clozapine is initiated. Patients who classify as a responder in phase I, II or III, are drop outs or who are non-responders at the end of phase III flow to the psychosocial intervention component of the study. During this part, several interventions are tested, aimed to increase treatment compliance and keep patients on the medication to which they've responded well. Through the biological predictor component, it is determined whether glutamatergic markers predict response to first and second line treatments, and if an empirical combination of pharmacogenetic, proteomics- and metabolomic markers can provide clinical valuable predictive value.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 40 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • schizophrenia, schizophreniform or schizoaffective disorder as defined by DSM-IV
  • Age 18-40 years
  • Written informed consent.
  • Female patients of childbearing potential need to utilize a proper method of contraception.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • A time interval between the onset of psychosis and study entry exceeding two years.
  • Prior use of antipsychotic medication longer than an episode of two weeks in the previous year and/or 6 weeks lifetime.
  • Intolerance to one of the drugs in this study.
  • Patients who are coercively treated at a psychiatric guardian (based on a judicial ruling)
  • Patients who are represented by a legal ward or under legal custody
  • The presence of one or more of the contraindications against any of the study drugs as mentioned in the IB texts
  • Pregnancy, as determined through a pregnancy test, or lactation
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01248195

  Hide Study Locations
Locations
Australia
Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre Recruiting
Carlton South, Australia, 3053
Contact: Christos Pantelis, MB BS, MD, MRCPsych, FRANZCP    +6103 83441870    cpant@unimelb.edu.au   
Contact: Antonia Merritt, PhD    +61383958139    Antonia.Merritt@wh.org.au   
Austria
Department of Biological Psychiatry, Innsbruck University Clinics Recruiting
Innsbruck, Austria, A-6020
Contact: Wolfgang Fleischhacker, MD, PhD       wolfgang.fleischhacker@i-med.ac.at   
Belgium
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KU Leuven) Recruiting
Leuven, Belgium, B - 3070
Contact: Marc de Hert, MD, PhD       marc.de.hert@uc-kortenberg.be   
Bulgaria
University Specialised Hospital for Active Treatment in Neurology and Psychiatry "St. Naum" Not yet recruiting
Sofia, Bulgaria, 1113
Contact: Lucho Hranov, MD PhD    359 2 9702230    lucho.hranov@gmail.com   
Czech Republic
Psychiatrické centrum Praha Recruiting
Prague, Ustavni 91, Czech Republic, 181 03 Praha 8-Bohnice
Contact: Pavel Mohr, MD PhD    420-266-003-360    mohr@pcp.lf3.cuni.cz   
Psychiatrická klinika LF UK, Fakultní nemocnice Recruiting
Hradec Králové, Czech Republic, CZ - 500 05
Contact: Jan Libiger, MD, PhD       Libigerj@lfhk.cuni.cz   
Denmark
Center for Neuropsychiatric Research Recruiting
Glostrup, Denmark, DK-2600
Contact: Birte Glenthøj, MD, PhD       birgle01@glo.regionh.dk   
France
Institut National de la Santé et de la Reserche Médicale (INSERM) Recruiting
Créteil Cedex, France, 94010
Contact: Marion Leboyer, MD, PhD       marion.leboyer@inserm.fr   
Germany
Martin-Luther-University (MLU) of Halle-Wittenberg Recruiting
Halle, Germany, 06097
Contact: Dan Rujescu, MD PhD    0049 345 55 21589    dan.rujescu@uk-halle.de   
Deprtment of Psychiatry, University of Heidelberg Not yet recruiting
Mannheim, Germany, J 5, D-68159
Contact: Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg, MD, PhD       a.meyer-lindenberg@zi-mannheim.de   
Ludwig-Maximilians University München Recruiting
München, Germany, 80336
Contact: Dan Rujescu, MD, PhD       Dan.rujescu@med.uni-muenchen.de   
Technische Universität München (TUM) Recruiting
München, Germany, 81675
Contact: Stefan Leucht, MD, PhD       Stefan.leucht@lrz.tum.de   
Israel
Sheba Medical Centre Department of Psychiatry Recruiting
Tel Hashomer, Israel, 52621
Contact: Michael Davidson, MD, PhD       m.davidson6@gmail.com   
Italy
Department of Psychiatry University of Naples Recruiting
Naples, Italy, 80138
Contact: Silvana Galderisi, MD, PhD       sgalderi@tin.it   
Netherlands
University Medical Center Utrecht Recruiting
Utrecht, Netherlands, 3584 CX
Contact: Rene Kahn, MD, PhD       R.Kahn@umcutrecht.nl   
Poland
Department of Adult Psychiatry, University of Medical Sciences Recruiting
Poznan, Poland, 60-572
Contact: Janusz Rybakowski, MD, PhD       rybakows@wlkp.top.pl   
Romania
Obregia Psychiatric Hospital Recruiting
Bucuresti, Romania, 7000
Contact: Dan Prelipceanu, MD, PhD       prelipceanudan@yahoo.com   
Spain
Hospital Clinic i Provincial Recruiting
Barcelona, Spain, 08036 Barcelona
Contact: Miquel Bernardo, MD PhD    +34 915 868 698    mbioque@clinic.ub.es   
Instituto de Investigación Hospital 12 de Octubre Recruiting
Madrid, Spain, 28041 Madrid
Contact: Tomas Palomo, MD PhD    +34 91 390 80 22    tpalomo.hdoc@salud.madrid.org   
Servicio Madrileño de Salud (SERMAS) Recruiting
Madrid, Spain, 28007
Contact: Celso Arango, MD, PhD       carango@hggm.es   
Hospital Clínico San Carlos Recruiting
Madrid, Spain, 28040 Madrid
Contact: Juan José López-Ibor, MD PhD    +34 913303000    sabrinasanchez1984@hotmail.com   
Universidad de Oviedo Recruiting
Oviedo, Spain, 33011 Oviedo
Contact: Julio Bobes, MD PhD    34 985 117994    bobes@uniovi.es   
Switzerland
Clienia Schlössli AG, Privatklinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie Recruiting
Oetwil am See/Zürich, Switzerland, CH-8618
Contact: Gregor Berger, MD, PhD       Gregor.berger@clienia.ch   
United Kingdom
West London Mental Health Trust Recruiting
London, United Kingdom, W12 0NN
Contact: James Stone, MD PhD    +44 (0)20 7594 7087    james.m.stone@imperial.ac.uk   
King's College London, Departments of Psychological Medicine, Psychiatry & Cognitive Neuroscience Recruiting
London, United Kingdom, SE5 8AF
Contact: Shitij Kapur, MD, PhD       Shitij.kapur@iop.kcl.ac.uk   
University of Manchester Recruiting
Manchester, United Kingdom, M13 9PL
Contact: Shon Lewis, MD, PhD       Shon.lewis@manchester.ac.uk   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Rene Kahn
King's College London
Technische Universität München
University of Manchester
Ludwig-Maximilians - University of Munich
Investigators
Principal Investigator: René Kahn, MD, PhD University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands
  More Information

Additional Information:
No publications provided

Responsible Party: Rene Kahn, MD PhD, UMC Utrecht
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01248195     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: KP7242114, 2010-020185-19
Study First Received: October 20, 2010
Last Updated: March 12, 2014
Health Authority: Austria: Ethikkommission
Belgium: Federal Agency for Medicinal Products and Health Products
Bulgaria: Ethics committee
Czech Republic: State Institute for Drug Control
Denmark: Danish Medicines Agency
France: Afssaps - Agence française de sécurité sanitaire des produits de santé (Saint-Denis)
Germany: Ethics Commission
Israel: Ethics Commission
Italy: Ethics Committee
Poland: Office for Registration of Medicinal Products, Medical Devices and Biocidal Products
Netherlands: The Central Committee on Research Involving Human Subjects (CCMO)
Romania: National Agency for Medicines and Medical Devices
Spain: Agencia Española de Medicamentos y Productos Sanitarios
Switzerland: Swissmedic
United Kingdom: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency
Australia: Human Research Ethics Committee

Keywords provided by UMC Utrecht:
Schizophrenia
Schizophreniform disorder
Schizoaffective disorder
Imaging
Prognosis
Treatment guidelines
Pharmacogenetics

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Disease
Psychotic Disorders
Schizophrenia
Mental Disorders
Pathologic Processes
Schizophrenia and Disorders with Psychotic Features
Clozapine
Olanzapine
Sulpiride
Sultopride
Antidepressive Agents
Antidepressive Agents, Second-Generation
Antiemetics
Antipsychotic Agents
Autonomic Agents
Central Nervous System Agents
Central Nervous System Depressants
Dopamine Agents
Dopamine Antagonists
GABA Agents
GABA Antagonists
Gastrointestinal Agents
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action
Neurotransmitter Agents
Neurotransmitter Uptake Inhibitors
Peripheral Nervous System Agents
Pharmacologic Actions
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Psychotropic Drugs
Serotonin Agents

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 28, 2014