Parental Knowledge and Attitudes of Confidential Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) Services for Teens

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified June 2010 by University of California, San Francisco.
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Kaiser Permanente
Information provided by:
University of California, San Francisco
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01144871
First received: June 14, 2010
Last updated: June 15, 2010
Last verified: June 2010
  Purpose

This study will provide new and important information regarding parental knowledge and attitudes of confidential STI and related health care services (prevention, diagnosis and treatment) for teens that may be needed to address the STI epidemic. Using both qualitative and quantitative methods, this study will gather information necessary to develop effective interventions aimed at the often neglected parent component of the teen-parent-health care provider partnership by giving parents knowledge and skills to help them facilitate their adolescent's access to confidential STI services as needed.


Condition
Sexually Transmitted Infections

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Official Title: Parental Knowledge and Attitudes of Confidential STI Services for Teens

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of California, San Francisco:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Determining parental attitudes regarding confidential health services for their teens [ Time Frame: 4 years ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Parental attitudes and knowledge regarding confidential health services will be assessed with focus groups, interviews and phone surveying.


Estimated Enrollment: 2295
Study Start Date: September 2007
Estimated Study Completion Date: August 2011
Estimated Primary Completion Date: August 2011 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts
Male Parent/Guardians
Male Parent/Guardian of Adolescent 12-17 yo. Health care members of either San Francisco General Hospital or Kaiser Permanente Northern California.
Female Parent/Guardian
Female Parent/Guardian of Adolescent 12-17 yo. Health care members of either San Francisco General Hospital or Kaiser Permanente Northern California.

  Hide Detailed Description

Detailed Description:

Teens' access to confidential services for sexually transmitted infections (STI's) has been assured over time by privacy protections established through statutory and policy routes. Yet, the STI epidemic among youth persists, in part , because many STI's are largely asymptomatic, remain undetected and continue to be transmitted unknowingly. Also, many teens are reluctant to obtain STI services due to embarrassment, fear of disclosure, lack of knowledge about STI diagnosis/treatment, and confidential STI services. How do we bridge the gap between availability and apparent lack of utilization by teens in need of confidential services to prevent STI's and their long term sequelae? One strategy that has been overlooked is the engagement of parents in a partnership with the teen and the provider to effectively guide the developing adolescent towards becoming a responsible and confident adult consumer of health services, especially regarding STI prevention and care including confidential services. Before developing the parental component to a broad-based effort aimed at decreasing the STI rate, especially C. trachomatis, it is important to examine parental knowledge and attitudes towards confidential STI health services for teens and how these might influence parental intention to facilitate their adolescent's accessing appropriate preventive care for STIs. We propose a multi-method research design in 2 phases. Phase 1 comprises a qualitative format (focus groups and 1:1 semi-structured interviews) designed to yield data on parental knowledge and attitudes about confidential STI related health care services for teens. Findings from Phase 1 will then inform Phase 2, a quantitative cross-sectional survey of a random sample of ethnically diverse parents of 12-17 yo teens designed to examine the following questions. First, how does parental knowledge and attitudes about STI confidential care for teens vary according: (a) the adolescent's age and gender; and (b) the specific parental characteristics, e.g., gender, race/ethnicity, insurance status, education, religiosity. Secondly, how does parental knowledge and attitudes about confidential care for teens affect parental behavioral intentions to facilitate their teen's gaining knowledge and skills to be able to access STI preventive confidential services. This research would inform investigations how to strengthen the role of parents and encourage partnerships between health care providers and parents to ultimately improve the health outcomes for teens.

Hypotheses:

  1. Parental knowledge of confidential care for adolescents will increase parental intention to facilitate confidential care
  2. Parental knowledge of STI's will be positively associated with their perceptions of their teen's susceptibility to/ severity of STI
  3. Parental knowledge or suspicion that their adolescent is having sex will be associated with perceptions that their teen is susceptibility to STIs
  4. Parental knowledge of STI's and/or knowledge/ suspicion adolescent is having sex will be associated with parental intention to facilitate confidential care
  5. Perceived susceptibility/severity of their teen to STI will be associated with a greater intention to facilitate confidential care
  6. Perceived benefits of confidential care will be associated with an greater intention to facilitate confidential care
  7. Perceived risks/barriers to confidential care (e.g., logistical/billing; busy practice, no policy/time for provider to see teen alone; perceived increase risky teen behavior due to such sexual health discussions) will be negatively associated with intention to facilitate confidential care
  8. Perceived self-efficacy will be associated with an greater intention to facilitate confidential care
  9. Past behavior/experiences regarding confidential care for parent and/or adolescent will be associated with intention to facilitate confidential care

Specific Aims:

i. To examine parental knowledge and attitudes of confidential health services related to STI care for adolescents

  1. To examine how parental knowledge and attitudes of confidentiality regarding STI and related health care services vary according to parent characteristics
  2. To examine how parental knowledge and attitudes of confidentiality regarding STI and related health care services vary according to child characteristics

ii. To examine how parental knowledge and attitudes toward confidential STI care affects the parent's behavioral intentions to support their adolescent's access to confidential care

iii. To identify key mechanisms that will form the basis of an intervention to improve parent-health care provider partnerships by giving parents knowledge and skills to help them facilitate their adolescent's access to confidential STI services as needed

  Eligibility

Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population

Parents/Guardians who have adolescents between 12-17 years of age

Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Parents/Guardians who have adolescents between 12-17 years of age

Exclusion Criteria:

  • NA
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01144871

Contacts
Contact: Kathleen Tebb, PhD 415-514-0941 tebbk@peds.ucsf.edu
Contact: Fay Chang, BA 415-514-1754 Changf@peds.ucsf.edu

Locations
United States, California
San Francisco General Hospital Recruiting
San Francisco, California, United States, 94110
Contact: Shannon Thyne, MD       SThyne@sfghpeds.ucsf.edu   
Kaiser Permanente Northern California Recruiting
San Francisco, California, United States, 94115
Contact: Charles Wibbelsman, MD       Charles.Wibbelsman@kp.org   
Principal Investigator: Charles Wibbelsman, MD         
Mission Neighborhood Health Center Completed
San Francisco, California, United States, 94110
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of California, San Francisco
Kaiser Permanente
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Mary-Ann Shafer, MD University of California, San Francisco
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Mary-Ann Shafer, MD, University of California, San Francisco
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01144871     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: H1095-31348, R01HD053408-01A2
Study First Received: June 14, 2010
Last Updated: June 15, 2010
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by University of California, San Francisco:
adolescent
reproductive health
parents
STIs
confidentiality
Examine parental knowledge/attitudes of confidential health services/STI care for adolescents.
Examine how parental knowledge/attitudes affects parent's behavioral intentions to support adolescent's access to confidential care.
Identify key mechanisms to form an intervention to parents knowledge/skills to facilitate teen's access to confidential STI services.

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Infection
Communicable Diseases
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Virus Diseases
Genital Diseases, Male
Genital Diseases, Female

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 19, 2014