Early Strength Training After Hip Fracture Surgery

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Lise Kronborg, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01616030
First received: June 5, 2012
Last updated: May 14, 2014
Last verified: May 2014

June 5, 2012
May 14, 2014
June 2012
March 2013   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Feasibility of progression in training loads (kg) during daily knee-extension strength training when commenced immediately after hip fracture surgery. [ Time Frame: Baseline to discharge, in average 10 days. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Feasibility is evaluated on the basis of adherence to program, adverse events, target training intensity, hip pain during training and other potential restricting factors, e.g. confusion, exhaustion and dropouts.
Change in maximum isometric knee-extension strength and strength deficits, fractured % of non-fractured limb measured by handheld dynamometer. [ Time Frame: Baseline to discharge, in average 10 days. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01616030 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Change in maximum isometric knee-extension strength and strength deficits, fractured % of non-fractured limb measured by handheld dynamometer. [ Time Frame: Baseline to discharge, in average 10 days. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Hip pain measured by Verbal Rang Scale (VRS) [ Time Frame: Baseline to discharge, in average 10 days. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Association between 10 meter fast speed walk and knee-extension strength discharge from hospital. [ Time Frame: Day before discharge from hospital. ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Not Provided
 
Early Strength Training After Hip Fracture Surgery
Feasibility of Progressive Strength Training in the Early Post Surgical Rehabilitation Period After Hip Fracture Surgery

Patients treated surgically for a hip fracture have a need of rehabilitation for the regain of former functional skills. Despite an optimized fast track in-hospital rehabilitation program it has been found that patients with hip fracture within 2 weeks after the hip fracture loose more than half of their muscle strength in the fractured limb compared to non-fractured limb. New studies including patients with total hip arthroplasty and strength training applied early after surgery has shown promising results regarding prevention of loss of muscle strength. No similar study has been found including patients with hip fracture.

The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of progressive knee-extension strength training of the hip fractured limb, starting Day 1 after surgical treatment for a hip fracture and proceeded every weekday during their hospital stay.

The study will include 20 patients surgically treated for a cervical hip fracture and 20 patients surgically treated for an intertrochanteric or subtrochanteric fracture. All patients are admitted from their own home. Age 60 years or older.

Kronborg L, Bandholm T, Palm H, Kehlet H, Kristensen MT (2014) Feasibility of Progressive Strength Training Implemented in the Acute Ward after Hip Fracture Surgery. PLoS ONE 9(4): e93332. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0093332

Interventional
Not Provided
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Hip Fractures
Other: Knee-extension strength training of the fractured limb
Daily knee-extension strength training with 3 x 10 repetitions using an intensity of 10 Repetition Maximum (RM) for the hip fractured limb started as soon as possible after surgery.
Experimental: Strength training, fractured limb

Knee-extension strength training of the fractured limb:

Daily knee-extension strength training with 3 x 10 repetitions using an intensity of 10 Repetition Maximum (RM) for the hip fractured limb started as soon as possible after surgery.

Intervention: Other: Knee-extension strength training of the fractured limb
Kronborg L, Bandholm T, Palm H, Kehlet H, Kristensen MT. Feasibility of progressive strength training implemented in the acute ward after hip fracture surgery. PLoS One. 2014 Apr 3;9(4):e93332. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0093332. eCollection 2014.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
36
March 2013
March 2013   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Hip fracture diagnosed patients age ≥60 years, admitted to the acute hip fracture unit.
  • Medial femoral neck fracture, pertrochanteric fracture or subtrochanteric fracture.
  • Ability to speak and understand the Danish language.
  • Cognitively well-preserved and able to give personal informed consent no later than by 5th post surgical day.
  • Home-residing and with an independent pre-fracture ability to walk equal to New Mobility Score at ≥ 2 indoor.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Multiple fractures
  • Postsurgical restrictions of mobilization
  • Patient not accepting participation in relevant exercise therapy
  • Fracture caused by cancer metastases
  • Terminal illness
  • Neurological impairment e.g. hemi paresis.
Both
60 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Denmark
 
NCT01616030
HH-S-1
Yes
Lise Kronborg, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre
Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre
Not Provided
Study Director: Morten T Kristensen, PhD Copenhagen University Hospital at Hvidovre, Denmark
Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre
May 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP