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Eating Behaviors Among Weight-Discordant Siblings

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Tanja Kral, University of Pennsylvania
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01598389
First received: May 8, 2012
Last updated: May 10, 2012
Last verified: May 2012

May 8, 2012
May 10, 2012
October 2008
May 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Energy intake [ Time Frame: Up to 4 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
%COMPX, EAH, dietary intake variables
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01598389 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Body composition [ Time Frame: Single assessment at Week 4 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Weight status (BMI-for-age percentile), BMI z-score, total body fat (%), waist circumference (cm), skinfold thickness (mm)
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Eating Behaviors Among Weight-Discordant Siblings
Eating Behaviors Among Weight-Discordant Siblings

The purpose of this study was to compare weight-discordant siblings in eating in the absence of hunger, caloric compensation, and the quality of their habitual diet. The investigator hypothesized that, within families and controlling for age differences, overweight and obese siblings would show greater eating in the absence of hunger, poorer caloric compensation, and poorer diet quality (e.g., increased percent of energy from fat and caloric beverages) compared to normal-weight siblings.

The study used a discordant sibling design to compare putative obesity-promoting eating traits among siblings, 5-12 years, who were raised in the same household, but were discordant for weight status (normal-weight: BMI-for-age between 5 and less than the 85th percentile; overweight/obese: BMI-for-age greater or equal to the 85th percentile). Forty-seven pairs of same-sex siblings (boys and girls) were recruited from the greater Philadelphia area to participate in a 4-week study during which their eating behaviors and body composition were assessed. The study tested the hypotheses that overweight/obese, compared to normal-weight, siblings exhibit 1) a weaker ability to compensate for calories, 2) a greater susceptibility towards eating in the absence of hunger, and 3) habitual dietary intakes that favor increased dietary energy density (kcal/g) and increased %energy derived from fat and caloric beverages. The use of a behavioral genetics design to study eating phenotypes among siblings is a unique approach to elucidate shared and non-shared environmental influences that can contribute to variations in weight status during childhood.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Subject)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Obesity
Other: Feeding study
In a crossover design, siblings were served dinner once a week for 3 weeks. Across conditions, siblings were served the same dinner, but, 25 minutes before dinner, they either consumed in full or did not consume one of two preloads that varied in energy density. On the day when no preload was consumed, eating in the absence of hunger was assessed after dinner and defined as the number of calories consumed from snacks. Habitual dietary intake was assessed using 24-hour dietary recalls.
  • Experimental: Low energy-dense preload
    Intervention: Other: Feeding study
  • Experimental: High energy-dense preload
    Intervention: Other: Feeding study
  • Experimental: No preload
    Intervention: Other: Feeding study
Kral TV, Allison DB, Birch LL, Stallings VA, Moore RH, Faith MS. Caloric compensation and eating in the absence of hunger in 5- to 12-y-old weight-discordant siblings. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):574-83. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.037952. Epub 2012 Aug 1.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
94
May 2011
May 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • same-sex;
  • weight discordant (normal-weight vs. overweight/obese);
  • meet age criteria;
  • like most foods that were served in the study.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • serious medical conditions or medication use known to affect appetite, food intake and body weight;
  • developmental or psychiatric conditions;
  • food allergies or nutrient intolerances (including lactose intolerance).
Both
5 Years to 12 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT01598389
K01DK078601
No
Tanja Kral, University of Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Principal Investigator: Tanja V.E. Kral, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania
University of Pennsylvania
May 2012

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP