Mothers and Girls Dancing Together Trial (MAGNET)

This study is ongoing, but not recruiting participants.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Sofiya Alhassan, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01588379
First received: April 25, 2012
Last updated: July 22, 2014
Last verified: July 2014

April 25, 2012
July 22, 2014
January 2013
December 2014   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Change from baseline in physical activity level at 12-weeks [ Time Frame: Baseline, 6-weeks and 12-weeks after study initiation ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01588379 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Changes in body mass index, fasting insulin, and psychosocial [ Time Frame: Baseline and 12-weeks after the initiation of the study protocol ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Mothers and Girls Dancing Together Trial
Effects of an Afro-centric Dance Program for African-American Daughters and Mothers

The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility and efficacy of a 12-week afterschool afro-centric dance physical activity program for daughters and mothers on the physical activity level of African-American girls.

Like African-American women, African-American girls suffer disproportionately from obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. One factor strongly associated with the development of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus disparities in children is low physical activity levels. Low physical activity is more prevalent in African-American girls, pointing to the critical need for effective physical activity interventions. For a physical activity intervention message to be effective among African-American girls, the program must be enjoyable and tailored to African-American girls and women. One possibility for an appropriate physical activity intervention is afro-centric dance, which has strong cultural and historical significance in the African-American community. This form of physical activity may provide girls with sustained bouts of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. There appears to be a strong positive correlation between parental and children physical activity levels. In the African-American culture, maternal health behaviors in particular have a strong influence on children's health behaviors. Currently, there are no studies that examine the effects of a daughter-mother Afro-centric dance program on the physical activity levels of African-American girls. Therefore, the purpose of this study will be to examine the feasibility and efficacy of a 12-week physical activity intervention consisting of afro-centric dance and its ability to affect the physical activity levels of African-American girls. If investigators identify afro-centric dance as a sustainable form of physical activity for African-American daughters and mothers, investigators can use this intervention to significantly reduce obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus in these groups.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Physical Activity
  • Behavioral: Girls and mothers Afro-centric dance program
    African-American girls and their mom's will participate in an after school Afro-centric dance program for 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Both girls and the mothers will also receive weekly newsletter containing various health information.
    Other Name: Girls and mothers, together
  • Behavioral: Girls, alone
    African-American girls (without their mom's) will participate in an after school Afro-centric dance program for 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Both girls and the mothers will also receive weekly newsletter containing various health information.
    Other Name: Girls, alone
  • Other: Newsletter
    Both girls and the mothers will receive weekly newsletter containing various health information.
    Other Name: Control
  • Experimental: Girls and mothers dance together
    African-American girls AND their mom's will participate in the Afro-centric dance program together and also receive weekly newsletter that focuses on health related issues.
    Intervention: Behavioral: Girls and mothers Afro-centric dance program
  • Experimental: Girls, alone
    African-American girls will participate in the Afro-centric dance program alone. Girls and mom's will receive weekly newsletter that focuses on health related issues
    Intervention: Behavioral: Girls, alone
  • Active Comparator: No dancing
    African-American girls and their mom's will only receive weekly newsletter that focuses on health related issues.
    Intervention: Other: Newsletter
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Active, not recruiting
99
December 2014
December 2014   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria for Girls:

  • 7 -10 yrs old on the date of randomization
  • Defined as African-American if her parent/guardian identifies her as such
  • No inclusion criteria will be used for mothers

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Unable to wear the activity monitor
  • Unable to participate in physical activity, require oxygen supplementation for exertion, have a developmental or physical disability preventing participation, cannot increase their physical activity for any reason, uncorrected structural heart disease)
  • If girl and/or mother is unable to read, understand, or complete the informed consent or surveys in English.
  • Musculoskeletal injuries or disorders that would prevent participation
  • Taking diabetes (type 1 or 2), renal diseases, eating disorder, pregnancy medication
  • Take medications affecting growth (e.g., insulin, oral hypoglycemic, thyroid hormone)
Female
7 Years to 11 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT01588379
2010-0804
No
Sofiya Alhassan, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Sofiya Alhassan, PhD University of Massachusetts, Amherst
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
July 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP