The Neural Basis of Lumbosacral Proprioceptive Impairment in Recurrent Low Back Pain

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Agentschap voor Innovatie door Wetenschap en Technologie
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Simon Brumagne, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01540617
First received: February 23, 2012
Last updated: April 11, 2014
Last verified: April 2014

February 23, 2012
April 11, 2014
April 2012
April 2014   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Structural changes in white matter pathways (3DTFE and DTI) (in individuals with recurrent non-specific low back pain compared to healthy controls) [ Time Frame: One time point ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Changes in resting state activity between individuals with recurrent non-specific low back pain and healthy controls) [ Time Frame: One time point ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Proprioceptive postural control (center of pressure displacement in response to muscle vibration) [ Time Frame: One time point ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01540617 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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The Neural Basis of Lumbosacral Proprioceptive Impairment in Recurrent Low Back Pain
The Neural Basis of Lumbosacral Proprioceptive Impairment in Recurrent Low Back Pain

Low back pain (LBP) is a well known health problem in Western society that is significantly responsible for socio-economic problems like absenteeism and disability. The lifetime prevalence of LBP is 60-80% and approximately 85% of this LBP has a "non-specific" character whereby the underlying causes and risk factors cannot be demonstrated. While many people recover within a month, most individuals will have recurrence within a year with more severe symptoms. This might be due to insufficient knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Impaired proprioception, the ability to discern body/limb positions and movements, may cause and maintain LBP shown by an altered postural control strategy. Specifically, patients with LBP rely more on proprioceptive signals from the ankles due to less reliable proprioceptive input of proximal segments. Moreover, they show a decreased variability in postural control and less postural robustness, while variability is a prerequisite for optimal functioning of biological systems. However, further clarification of the neural correlates is necessary. Deficits in proprioception, as found in a subgroup of patient with LBP, are associated with a decreased ability of the brain to process proprioceptive inputs.

The aim of this project is to clarify the central changes in individuals with recurrent non-specific low back pain and healthy controls. To evaluate these central changes MRI techniques (3DTFE, DTI and RS-fMRI) will be used. In addition, the association between central changes and postural control tasks will be evaluated.

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Observational
Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
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Probability Sample

Leuven and surrounding area

Low Back Pain
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  • Persons with low back pain
  • Healthy persons

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
36
April 2014
April 2014   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria persons with low back pain:

  • Age: 20-50 year
  • At least 6 months of low back pain with/without referred pain in buttock/thigh
  • At least 3 episodes of disabling low back pain
  • At least a score of 14% on the Oswestry Disability Index
  • Willingness to sign the informed consent
  • Met the MRI related requirements

Inclusion Criteria healthy persons:

  • Age: 20-50 year
  • No history of low back pain
  • A score of 0% on the Oswestry Disability Index
  • Willingness to sign the informed consent
  • Met the MRI related requirements

Exclusion Criteria:

  • History of major trauma and/or major orthopedic surgery of the spine, the pelvis or the lower quadrant
  • One of the following conditions: Parkinson, MS, Stroke with sequels....
  • Radicular symptoms
  • Not Dutch-speaking
  • Strong opioids
  • Neck pain
  • Ankle problems
  • Smoking
Both
20 Years to 50 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Belgium
 
NCT01540617
2012_SBrumagne_MRIproprio
Yes
Simon Brumagne, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
Agentschap voor Innovatie door Wetenschap en Technologie
Principal Investigator: Simon Brumagne, Professor Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
April 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP