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Investigation of the Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Taste Reward in Humans

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified September 2012 by Imperial College London.
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Medical Research Council
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Carel Le Roux, Imperial College London
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01531738
First received: February 6, 2012
Last updated: September 28, 2012
Last verified: September 2012

February 6, 2012
September 28, 2012
July 2010
August 2013   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Breakpoints [ Time Frame: 2 weeks pre and 8-12 weeks post operatively for surgical patients or on two occasions 10-14 weeks apart for normal weight control group ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Change in breakpoints in the last completed ratio of the computer task (breakpoints reflect the affective value of the reinforcer used)
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01531738 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Hunger [ Time Frame: 2 weeks pre and 8-12 weeks post operatively for surgical patients or on two occasions 10-14 weeks apart for normal weight control group ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    change in hunger levels quantified by a 100mm visual analogue scale
  • Body mass index [ Time Frame: 2 weeks pre and 8-12 weeks post operatively for surgical patients or on two occasions 10-14 weeks apart for normal weight control group ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    change in BMI will be quantified based on the participants weight in kilograms and height in meters
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Investigation of the Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Taste Reward in Humans
Investigation of the Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Taste Reward in Humans

Severe obesity is associated with excessive food eating and appetite. Bariatric surgery (also known as 'obesity surgery' or 'weight loss surgery') is a well known treatment for severely obese individuals. The way in which these operations achieve weight loss is not fully understood. The investigators hypothesize that some of these changes in the reduced appetite after surgery may be due to alterations in taste. The aim is to compare obese patients before and after bariatric surgery (gastric bypass and banding) to define the reward value of sweet, fatty and vegetable/fruit taste in obese individuals, and how this changes after surgery.

Not Provided
Observational
Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Prospective
Not Provided
Not Provided
Non-Probability Sample

Patients with obesity attending a specialist obesity clinic and normal weight controls who are staff at Imperial College London

Obesity
Not Provided
  • Control
    Normal weight healthy volunteers
  • Gastric banding
    obese patients undergoing gastric banding obesity surgery
  • Gastric bypass
    obese patients due to undergo gastric bypass surgery
Miras AD, Jackson RN, Jackson SN, Goldstone AP, Olbers T, Hackenberg T, Spector AC, le Roux CW. Gastric bypass surgery for obesity decreases the reward value of a sweet-fat stimulus as assessed in a progressive ratio task. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):467-73. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.036921. Epub 2012 Jul 25.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
20
August 2013
August 2013   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • BMI of 18-25 for normal weight volunteers
  • BMI of >30 for obese patients

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Pregnancy
  • breast feeding
  • substance abuse
  • consumption of more than 3 alcoholic units per day
  • severe psychiatric illness
  • lack of understanding of test instructions
  • diabetes mellitus
  • chronic medical conditions making a general anaesthetic unsafe
  • allergy to stimulus ingredients
  • active smoking
Both
18 Years to 65 Years
Yes
Contact: Alexander D Miras, MRCP 00442083831029 a.miras@nhs.net
United Kingdom
 
NCT01531738
PRT
Yes
Carel Le Roux, Imperial College London
Imperial College London
Medical Research Council
Principal Investigator: Carel W le Roux, MRCP PhD Imperial College London
Imperial College London
September 2012

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP