Factors Associated With Short Withdrawal Time and Polyp Detection Rate During Colonoscopy

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of British Columbia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01487356
First received: August 3, 2011
Last updated: December 5, 2011
Last verified: December 2011

August 3, 2011
December 5, 2011
May 2008
June 2009   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01487356 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Factors Associated With Short Withdrawal Time and Polyp Detection Rate During Colonoscopy
Factors Associated With Short Withdrawal Time and Polyp Detection Rate During Colonoscopy

Colonoscopy withdrawal times are a critical element in determining quality of colonoscopy; however, few studies have evaluated specific factors that may influence the duration of withdrawal, and specifically short withdrawal times. Other factors affecting polyp detection rate, one element of quality of colonoscopy, also need further study. By collecting data on hundreds of colonoscopies performed by 9 endoscopists, our goal was to identify factors associated with withdrawal time, inappropriately short withdrawal times, and polyp detection rate during colonoscopy.

Background:

Colonoscopy withdrawal times are a critical element in determining quality of colonoscopy; however, few studies have evaluated specific factors that may influence the duration of withdrawal, and specifically short withdrawal times. Other factors affecting polyp detection rate, one element of quality of colonoscopy, also need further study.

Objective:

To identify factors associated with withdrawal time, inappropriately short withdrawal times, and polyp detection rate during colonoscopy.

Design:

Data were prospectively collected (05/08-06/09) on 802 colonoscopies conducted by 9 blinded endoscopists, including patient age and sex, indication, colonoscope insertion and withdrawal time, biopsies performed, number/size of polyps and method of resection, bowel preparation quality, time of day, day of week, endoscopist, position of the procedure within the endoscopist's slate, and call status of the endoscopist.

Setting:

This study was conducted at a single tertiary care hospital, St. Paul's Hospital, in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Observational
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Non-Probability Sample

All adult patients undergoing colonoscopy at St. Paul's Hospital in Vancouver, BC.

Colon Polyps
Other: No intervention
Colonoscopies were conducted as per the endoscopist's usual practice. No change in protocol was expected.
Patients undergoing colonoscopy
Data was collected on all adult patients undergoing outpatient colonoscopy at St. Paul's Hospital from May 2008 to June 2009. Exclusion criteria were prior colon resection and repeat colonoscopy for the purpose of endoscopic therapy for known lesions.
Intervention: Other: No intervention
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
802
June 2009
June 2009   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • All adult patients undergoing colonoscopy at St. Paul's Hospital in Vancouver, BC.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Exclusion criteria were prior colon resection and repeat colonoscopy for the purpose of endoscopic therapy for known lesions.
Both
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No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Canada
 
NCT01487356
H10-00312
No
University of British Columbia
University of British Columbia
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Rob Enns, MD University of British Columbia
University of British Columbia
December 2011

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP