Study on Out of School Nutrition and Physical Activity Environments (OSNAP)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by:
Harvard School of Public Health
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01396473
First received: January 27, 2011
Last updated: July 15, 2011
Last verified: July 2011

January 27, 2011
July 15, 2011
September 2010
June 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Change in physical activity [ Time Frame: Participants' physical activity will be measure over the course of 5 consecutive school days pre-intervention and 5 consecutive school days post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Accelerometer and SOPLAY observation
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01396473 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Change in dietary intake [ Time Frame: Participants' dietary intake will be measure over the course of 5 consecutive school days pre-intervention and 5 consecutive school days post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
plate waste consumption
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Study on Out of School Nutrition and Physical Activity Environments
Study on Out of School Nutrition and Physical Activity Environments

The purpose of this study is to design and conduct research to tailor out of school time evaluation materials so they are applicable to various settings in Boston, are efficient in that minimal resources and time are used, and are useful to participants.

Nearly half of Boston's school age children (49%) participate in out of school time programs, a critical time to intervene on physical activity and nutrition. Previous research has mostly focused on during-school-day efforts, or on child care policies and practices for very young children, leaving a gap in the knowledge of what might work with programs serving school-age children during out of school time. OSNAP aims to implement low cost and sustainable policy and environmental interventions to improve physical activity and healthy eating/beverage environments. Data will be collected via observations, plate waste and accelerometers on program policies, environments, practices and behavioral outcomes related to physical activity, beverage, snack and screen time outcomes.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Prevention
  • Child Physical Activity
  • Child Nutrition
Behavioral: Policy and Environmental Change
Afterschool programs participate in an assessment of physical activity and nutrition practices and policies. Study staff work with teams of afterschool programs in a participatory manner to identify areas in which programs would like to take practice, policy and communication efforts to meet physical activity and nutrition goals. Teams share progress and barriers during ongoing collaborative meetings.
  • No Intervention: control
  • Experimental: Policy and Environmental Change
    Intervention: Behavioral: Policy and Environmental Change
Giles CM, Kenney EL, Gortmaker SL, Lee RM, Thayer JC, Mont-Ferguson H, Cradock AL. Increasing water availability during afterschool snack: evidence, strategies, and partnerships from a group randomized trial. Am J Prev Med. 2012 Sep;43(3 Suppl 2):S136-42. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2012.05.013.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
590
June 2011
June 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Afterschool programs in Boston MA serving at least 40 children ages 5-12 years operating the full school year between September and June
  • Afterschool programs serving a snack to children
  • Children between the ages of 5 and 12 years
Both
5 Years to 12 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT01396473
18046, CDC Grant Number
No
Steven Gortmaker/Professor of the Practice of Health Sociology, Department of Society, Human Development and Health; Harvard School of Public Helath
Harvard School of Public Health
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Principal Investigator: Steven Gortmaker, PhD Harvard School of Public Health
Harvard School of Public Health
July 2011

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP