Frequency and Origin of Dysnatremias in the Emergency Department

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified April 2012 by University Hospital Inselspital, Berne.
Recruitment status was  Not yet recruiting
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Steering committee of the NCCR
Information provided by:
University Hospital Inselspital, Berne
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01326429
First received: March 29, 2011
Last updated: April 17, 2012
Last verified: April 2012

March 29, 2011
April 17, 2012
August 2012
Not Provided
Frequency of hypo- and hypernatremia in the emergency department [ Time Frame: approx. 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
We aim to determine the frequency of hypo- and hypernatremia in the emergency department of a large tertiary university hospital.
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT01326429 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Origin of hypo- and hypernatremia in the emergency department [ Time Frame: approx. 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
We try to investiagte the mechanisms leading to the development of hypo- and hypernatremia in patients admitted to the emergency department.
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Frequency and Origin of Dysnatremias in the Emergency Department
Frequency and Origin of Dysnatremias in the Emergency Department

Hypo- and hypernatremia are the most frequent electrolyte disorders found in hospitalized patients. The increasing use of diuretics and other medications influencing the water and sodium homeostasis potentially lead to a rise in the prevalence of the electrolyte disorders. Only little data is available on the frequency and the mechanisms leading to hypo-/hypernatremia.

Thus, the investigators aim to A.) determine the frequency of hypo- and hypernatremia in the emergency department of a large tertiary university hospital and B.) explore the mechanisms leading to the development of dysnatremias by detailed clinical and laboratory examinations.

Not Provided
Observational
Observational Model: Case-Only
Time Perspective: Prospective
Not Provided
Retention:   Samples With DNA
Description:

whole blood

Non-Probability Sample

All patients admitted to the emergency department of a large tertiary university hospital with a serum sodium below 135 mmol/L (hyponatremia) or exceeding 145 mmol/L.

  • Hyponatremia
  • Hypernatremia
Not Provided
  • Hypernatremia
    Patients admitted to the emergency department with a serum sodium exceeding 145 mmol/L.
  • Hyponatremia
    Patients admitted to the emergency room with a serum sodium below 135 mmol/L.
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Not yet recruiting
200
Not Provided
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Inclusion Criteria:

  • Serum sodium below 135 mmol/L (i.e. hyponatremia); serum sodium exceeding 145 mmol/L (hypernatremia)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients below age 18 years; patients declining study participation.
Both
18 Years and older
No
Contact: Gregor Lindner, M.D. +41326329629 gregor.lindner@insel.ch
Contact: Felix J Frey, M.D. +41316329629 felix.frey@insel.ch
Switzerland
 
NCT01326429
KEK 019/11
No
Gregor Lindner M.D., Dept. of Nephrology and Hypertension, Inselspital Bern, University of Bern
University Hospital Inselspital, Berne
Steering committee of the NCCR
Principal Investigator: Gregor Lindner, M.D. Dept. of Nephrology and Hypertension, Inselspital Bern, University of Bern
Study Chair: Felix J Frey, M.D. Dept. of Nephrology and Hypertension, Inselspital Bern, University of Bern
University Hospital Inselspital, Berne
April 2012

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP