Comparison of Elution Swab (ESwab) and Amies Transport Swabs for Screening Patients for Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Colonization (MRSA VRE)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
McMaster University
St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton
Information provided by:
McMaster University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00941122
First received: July 16, 2009
Last updated: July 19, 2011
Last verified: July 2011

July 16, 2009
July 19, 2011
July 2009
January 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • 1. To assess whether the Elution swab (ESwab) is superior to Amies transport swabs for the detection of MRSA/VRE [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • 1. To assess whether the Elution swab (ESwab) is superior to Amies transport swabs for the detection of MRSA/VRE in colonized patients [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00941122 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
To assess patient comfort in the use of the ESwab vs. Amies Transport swab for screening patients for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Comparison of Elution Swab (ESwab) and Amies Transport Swabs for Screening Patients for Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Colonization
Comparison of Elution Swab (ESwab) and Amies Transport Swabs for Screening Patients for Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) Colonization

1.To assess whether the Elution swab (ESwab) is superior to Amies transport swabs for the detection of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) in colonized patients and to determine whether nasal cultures alone is sufficient for detection of MRSA isolates in hospitalized patients. 2.To assess patient comfort in the use of the ESwab vs. Amies Transport swab for screening patients for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus.

MRSA is a major cause of nosocomial and life threatening infections. Infections with MRSA have been associated with a significantly higher morbidity, mortality and costs than methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA).1 Selection of these organisms has been greatest in the healthcare setting; however, MRSA have also become more prevalent in the community.2 To control the transmission of MRSA, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) has recommended guidelines, which include an active surveillance program to identify potential reservoirs and a rigorous infection control program to control the spread of MRSA. Accurate identification of patients colonized with MRSA is essential in managing the transmission of the organism. It is currently unknown whether the currently utilized collection rayon swab is the optimal swab in detecting colonized patients The purpose of this study is to directly compare whether Eluted (ESwab) swab is superior to the currently utilized rayon swab in identifying MRSA/VRE colonized patients.

Observational
Time Perspective: Prospective
Not Provided
Not Provided
Non-Probability Sample

Hospitalized patients known to be colonized with MRSA/VRE

Eluted Swab
Device: Eluted Swab
Comparison of Eluted Swab with AMIES swab for detection of MRSA/VRE
MRSA/VRE patients
patients known to be colonized with MRSA/VRE
Intervention: Device: Eluted Swab
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
30
March 2011
January 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Hospitallized patients known to be colonized with MRSA/VRE

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Unable to provide informed consent
Both
Not Provided
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Canada
 
NCT00941122
MRSA.VRE.Detection
No
Christine Lee, McMaster University
Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation
  • McMaster University
  • St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton
Principal Investigator: Christine Lee, MD McMaster University
McMaster University
July 2011

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP