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Effects of a Computer Game on Activity Choices

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University at Buffalo
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00875511
First received: April 2, 2009
Last updated: June 25, 2010
Last verified: April 2009

April 2, 2009
June 25, 2010
November 2008
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amount of food chosen amount of social time chosen [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00875511 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Effects of a Computer Game on Activity Choices
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The study seeks to discover whether peer rejection increases the value of food relative to peer interaction in overweight individuals. After playing a computer game that randomly simulates peer rejection or peer acceptance, participants will play another computer game that will assess the value of food and social interactions.

Overweight individuals may be more likely to resort to food in moments of distress and less likely to choose to interact with a peer to reestablish their sense of belongingness.

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Observational
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Probability Sample

Adults between the ages of 18-50

Overweight
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
40
September 2009
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Inclusion Criteria:

  • Adults ages 18-50
  • Adults with a BMI greater than or equal to 18.5
  • Adults must report at least a moderate liking of study foods used

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Adults should have no psychopathology
  • Adults should have no developmental disabilities
  • Adults should have no cold or upper respiratory distress that could influence their activities
  • Adults should have not be taking medications that could affect their food intake
  • Adults should have no dietary restrictions
  • Adults should have no food allergies
Both
18 Years to 50 Years
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00875511
Study #3480
No
Sarah-Jeanne Salvy, Ph.D., University at Buffalo
University at Buffalo
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Principal Investigator: Sarah J Salvy, Ph.D. University at Buffalo
University at Buffalo
April 2009

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP