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Prosocial Behavior and Exercise Among Older Adults

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified June 2009 by National Institute on Aging (NIA).
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00747019
First received: September 3, 2008
Last updated: June 30, 2009
Last verified: June 2009

September 3, 2008
June 30, 2009
December 2008
June 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Self-reported physical activity [ Time Frame: Baseline, 3 and 9 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00747019 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Physical function, health-related quality of life [ Time Frame: Baseline, 3 and 9 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Prosocial Behavior and Exercise Among Older Adults
Prosocial Behavior and Exercise Among Older Adults

The purpose of this study is to compare two exercise programs to determine how well they help older adults make exercise a regular habit after 9 months.

Although only a small percentage of older adults engage in habitual physical activity, previous studies have demonstrated interventions that include cognitive-behavioral strategies can enhance long-term, independent physical activity. In addition, there are episodic charity events, such as charity walks, that attract large numbers of participants of all age ranges to engage in moderate-intensity physical activity. These actions are a form of prosocial behavior, defined as voluntary, intentional behavior that results in benefits for another. The opportunity to help others seems to be a motive in inspiring these individuals to at least engage in one session of moderate physical activity. Thus, the current research project contemplates whether prosocial behavior may be implemented as a viable behavioral incentive for long-term physical activity.

Both the Prosocial Behavior Physical Activity (PBPA) group and the Physical Exercise (PE) group will receive a cognitive-behavioral intervention to teach participants the behavioral skills necessary to engage in long-term (9-month) independent physical activity. Both programs will provide supervised exercise sessions so that participants learn how to safely and effectively engage in physical activity, and both programs will help participants set goals for activity and overcome barriers to exercise. However, in PBPA group, participants will be able to also earn boxes of food for donation to a charity based upon their physical activity.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
  • Health-Related Quality of Life
  • Physical Activity
  • Physical Function
  • Behavioral: Prosocial Behavior Physical Activity (PBPA)
    The PBPA condition involves a center-based cognitive-behavioral intervention to teach participants the behavioral skills to engage in long-term (9-month) independent physical activity; delivered three times a week months 1-3; independent physical activity months 4-9. PBPA participants also earn boxes of food for donation to the Second Harvest Food Bank (SHFB) of Northwest North Carolina based upon their weekly physical activity.
  • Behavioral: Physical Exercise (PE)
    The PE condition is a center-based cognitive-behavioral intervention to teach participants the behavioral skills to engage in long-term (9-month) independent physical activity; delivered three times a week months 1-3; independent physical activity months 4-9.
  • Experimental: PBPA
    Intervention: Behavioral: Prosocial Behavior Physical Activity (PBPA)
  • Active Comparator: PE
    Intervention: Behavioral: Physical Exercise (PE)

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
80
June 2010
June 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Between 55 and 80 years of age
  • Physically underactive (moderate or vigorous physical activity for less than 2 days per week for the preceding 3 months)
  • No evidence of any major psychological illness
  • Written permission from the participant's primary care physician with specific certification of no severe risk of cardiovascular disease
  • Participant resides within a 35-mile radius of the study site
  • Participant will remain in the area for the duration of the study

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Self-reported evidence of cardiovascular disease risk, or documentation by the primary care physician of at least one of the following within the past 5 years:

    • Myocardial infarction (MI)
    • Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)
    • Chronic or unstable angina at rest or during physical exertion
    • New York Heart Association (NYHA) Type I through Type IV congestive heart failure
    • Unstable ventricular arrhythmias
    • Cardiovascular surgery (coronary artery or valvular heart disease)
    • Ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke
    • Intermittent claudication during physical activity
    • Edema in feet
  • Self-reported or documented evidence of rheumatoid arthritis
  • Self-reported or physician-reported evidence of current cigarette or cigar smoking
  • Self-reported treatment for psychiatric illness within the past 5 years:

    • Treatment for major depression or schizophrenia
    • Currently receiving lithium or neuroleptics
    • Hospitalization with the last 5 years for depression, or clinical judgment of treatment for major depression
  • Hearing or sight impairments
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Alcohol consumption greater than 21 drinks per week, or self-reported alcoholism
  • Inability to speak or read English
  • Judgment of clinical staff
  • Current participation in another medical intervention study
Both
55 Years to 80 Years
Yes
Contact: Carol Massa-Fanale, MS 336-716-3589 cmassa@wfubmc.edu
Contact: Susan J. Harris 336-713-4244 sjharris@wfubmc.edu
United States
 
NCT00747019
AG0106, 1R21AG027413-01A2
Yes
Capri G. Foy, Ph.D., M.S, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Capri G. Foy, PhD, MS Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
June 2009

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP