Self-monitoring of Blood Pressure in Primary Care

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario
Information provided by:
Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00717665
First received: July 15, 2008
Last updated: June 24, 2011
Last verified: June 2011

July 15, 2008
June 24, 2011
June 2007
June 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
The change in mean daytime systolic BP from baseline to the last (12-month) visit on 24-hour ambulatory. [ Time Frame: 1 year ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00717665 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • mean change in systolic and diastolic BP on 24-hour ambulatory and one-week home BP monitoring [ Time Frame: from the baseline to the last (12-month) visit ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
  • mean change in daytime diastolic BP on 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring [ Time Frame: from the baseline to the last (12-month) visit ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
  • mean change in systolic and diastolic BP during the sleep period on 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring [ Time Frame: from the baseline to the last (12-month) visit ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
  • the proportion of patients at systolic BP goal, defined as <130 mmHg and diastolic BP goal, defined as <80 mm Hg, based on the 24-hour ambulatory BP and one-week home BP monitoring recording [ Time Frame: one year ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
  • number and doses of different classes of antihypertensive medications [ Time Frame: one year ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
  • average adherence rate with home BP monitoring [ Time Frame: one year ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
  • the number of adherence reminders in the tele-management group over the course of the study [ Time Frame: one year ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
  • the number of office visits of patients [ Time Frame: during the one year study period ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
  • determinants of adherence to tele-monitoring [ Time Frame: one year ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Self-monitoring of Blood Pressure in Primary Care
Self-monitoring of Blood Pressure in Primary Care in Older Diabetic Patients With Uncontrolled Systolic Hypertension

This study is an open randomized controlled trial of 12-month duration, which compares the use of a home blood pressure (BP) tele-management system to the usual approach of home BP monitoring in older diabetic patients with uncontrolled systolic hypertension. The purpose of this study is to determine whether home blood pressure tele-management system will markedly improve blood pressure control in a primary care setting.

Hypertension is a major risk factor for renal and cardiovascular disease (CVD). While the health benefits of lowering blood pressure (BP) are well documented, population surveys have consistently found that less than a quarter of hypertensive patients have their BP under good control. Self-monitoring of BP at home has been extensively evaluated as a potentially useful tool to improve BP control and medication adherence in hypertensive patients.

We developed a user-centric home BP tele-management system. The system captures all home self-measured BP readings and requires patients to set jointly with their physician their BP treatment goal, home BP monitoring schedule and BP alert levels. The system tracks the frequency, date and time of home readings, generates messages for patients and reports for physicians indicating whether the BP treatment goal has been reached, and sends BP alerts and adherence reminders for BP readings to patients and clinical BP alerts and reports to physicians. Using an open, randomized controlled parallel group trial design, older diabetic patients with uncontrolled systolic hypertension, recruited from the practice of primary care physicians, will receive either usual care approach to home BP monitoring or care that incorporates the use of the home BP tele-management system. The primary outcome measure is the change in mean daytime systolic BP from baseline to the last (12-month) visit on 24-hour ambulatory. The secondary objective is to examine the psychosocial factors that may make it difficult for some patients to monitor their blood pressure at home. The rationale for including a psychological component in the study is that a critical component of the system is adherence to self-monitoring. While adherence can be automatically determined through the telemanagement system, the determinants of adherence to this behaviour have not been adequately assessed in the literature. To gain insights into this aspect of health behaviour we will measure psychological predictors using quantitative and qualitative techniques. Moreover, monitoring adherence with home BP monitoring will provide a proxy measure of acceptance of the system as a poor adherence rate would suggest that patients perceive it as a futile exercise, not leading to any changes in their care.

This study tests a novel approach to treat hypertension, a major health problem in diabetic patients. The information from this study will be invaluable for future health care planning.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
High Blood Pressure
  • Device: Home blood pressure tele-management system.
    Scheduled blood pressure monitoring with transmission of information to a central server for processing and disbursement.
  • Other: Usual care.
    Patient self-monitoring of blood pressure with results taken by patient to the doctor at scheduled visits.
  • Experimental: A, 1, I
    Intervention: Device: Home blood pressure tele-management system.
  • Active Comparator: A, 2, I
    Intervention: Other: Usual care.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
110
June 2010
June 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (the onset of diabetes must have occurred on or after the age of 30 years and there is no history of diabetic ketoacidosis)
  • Uncontrolled systolic hypertension (defined as a daytime systolic BP of 130 mm Hg or higher on 24-hour ambulatory)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Conditions making the patient unsuitable for study such as severe cognitive impairment, language difficulties (unable to speak and understand instructions in English), frequent (more than once per month for more than week) or prolonged (more than 2 months) trips away from home, homelessness, self-identified substance abuse, being pregnant, or unable to use home BP device;
  • Life expectancy less than one year
  • Coexisting conditions that require frequent (more than once a month) office visits or repeated (more than once in the past year) hospitalizations
  • Atrial fibrillation or other cardiac arrhythmias requiring drug treatment
  • Moderately severe chronic renal failure defined as estimated GFR less than 25 mL/min
  • Myocardial infarction, episode of heart failure requiring hospitalization, or paralyzing stroke in the past year
  • Having unstable angina
  • Severe valvular heart diseases such as severe aortic stenosis
  • Symptomatic orthostatic hypotension
  • Refusal to sign consent form or to carry out the demands made by the study
Both
30 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Canada
 
NCT00717665
ESA 5970
No
Dr. Alexander Logan, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital
Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario
Principal Investigator: Alexander G. Logan, MD, FRCP(C) Mount Sinai Hospital, New York
Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital
June 2011

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP