Now Available for Public Comment: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) for FDAAA 801 and NIH Draft Reporting Policy for NIH-Funded Trials

Effects of a Mulligan Mobilisation in the Lumbar Flexion Range of Asymptomatic Subjects

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
University of Manchester
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00678093
First received: May 8, 2008
Last updated: May 13, 2008
Last verified: May 2008

May 8, 2008
May 13, 2008
January 2005
June 2005   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Range of Movement (ROM) [ Time Frame: 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00678093 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Effects of a Mulligan Mobilisation in the Lumbar Flexion Range of Asymptomatic Subjects
The Effects of the Mulligan Mobilisation Sustained Natural Apophyseal Glide (SNAG) in the Lumbar Flexion Range of Asymptomatic Subjects as Measured by the Zebris CMS20 3-D Motion Analysis System

Mulligan's mobilisation techniques are believed to increase the range of movement (ROM) in patients with low back pain. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical effects of Mulligan's "SNAG" technique on lumbar flexion ROM. The secondary aim was to measure the intra- and inter-day reliability of lumbar ROM employing the same procedure, and utilising a 3-D motion analysis system for measuring range of motion (ROM).

The primary aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical effects of Mulligan's "SNAG" technique on lumbar flexion ROM. The secondary aim was to measure the intra- and inter-day reliability of lumbar ROM employing the same procedure. For the interventional component of the study, 49 asymptomatic volunteers participated in it. Subjects were randomly assigned into either a treatment (SNAG) group (n=25), or a placebo (SHAM) group (n=24). The "SNAG" technique was applied on L3 and L4 spinal levels by an experienced manual therapist. SNAGs were performed with active flexion in sitting, 10 times at each level. The placebo-SHAM was similar to the SNAG without however applying the appropriate direction or force. Lumbar ROM was measured by a three dimensional electronic goniometer (Zebris CM20), before and after each technique. For the reliability component, five measurements in two different days (one week apart) were performed in 20 healthy subjects.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Double Blind (Subject, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Low Back Pain
Other: Application of the SNAG technique
SNAG is a painless and gentle manual technique, mimicking a slide with concurrent active movement, performed in the lumbar spine (in this study) by an experienced manual therapist-physiotherapist.
Other Names:
  • Sustained Natural Apophyseal Glide
  • Mulligan mobilisation
Experimental: SNAG
SNAG is a painless and gentle manual technique, mimicking a slide with concurrent active movement, performed in the lumbar spine (in this study) by an experienced manual therapist-physiotherapist.
Intervention: Other: Application of the SNAG technique
Moutzouri M, Billis E, Strimpakos N, Kottika P, Oldham JA. The effects of the Mulligan Sustained Natural Apophyseal Glide (SNAG) mobilisation in the lumbar flexion range of asymptomatic subjects as measured by the Zebris CMS20 3-D motion analysis system. BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2008 Oct 1;9:131.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
49
June 2005
June 2005   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • asymptomatic
  • health individuals

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Low back pain
  • spinal pathology
  • vascular or heart problems
  • subjects taking anticoagulants
Both
18 Years to 40 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United Kingdom
 
NCT00678093
Mulligan
No
Evdokia Billis, Lecturer in Physiotherapy, Department of Physiotherapy, TEI of Lamia
University of Manchester
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Evdokia Billis, MSc University of Manchester
University of Manchester
May 2008

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP