Expressive Writing and Adjustment to Metastatic Breast Cancer

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Indiana University
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00624156
First received: February 15, 2008
Last updated: January 25, 2012
Last verified: January 2012

February 15, 2008
January 25, 2012
February 2008
January 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Determine the potential utility of expressive writing for enhancing existential well-being (i.e., increasing a sense of meaning and peace and reducing demoralization) among women with metastatic breast cancer. [ Time Frame: conclusion of the study ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00624156 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Determine the potential utility of expressive writing for reducing distress (i.e., depressive symptoms, anxiety, cancer-specific and general distress) among women with metastatic breast cancer. [ Time Frame: conclusion of the study ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Determine the potential utility of expressive writing for reducing distress (i.e., depressive symptoms, anxiety, and general distress) among women with metastatic breast cancer. [ Time Frame: conclusion of the study ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
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Expressive Writing and Adjustment to Metastatic Breast Cancer
Expressive Writing and Adjustment to Metastatic Breast Cancer

We are doing this study to see if writing about life experiences helps women adjust to breast cancer that has spread. We will compare two groups. One group will write about their breast cancer experience. The other will write about their daily activities. What we learn from this study may help us to find new ways to help women cope with breast cancer that has spread.

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Observational
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Probability Sample

MSKCC clinics

Metastatic Breast Cancer
  • Behavioral: Writing Intervention
    Participants in the emotional disclosure condition will be instructed to write continuously for 20 minutes about their deepest thoughts and feelings regarding their cancer experience.
    Other Names:
    • Over four sessions, I want you to write about your experience with cancer. In your writing, I
    • want you to really let go and explore your very deepest emotions and thoughts. It is critical that you
    • delve deeply.
  • Behavioral: Writing Intervention
    Participants assigned to the control condition will be instructed to describe in a detailed, nonemotional manner their daily activities. The 20-minute writing task will be introduced as a time management intervention
    Other Names:
    • Over four sessions, I want you to write about how you use your time. I am interested in
    • everything you do during the course of a day. I realize that you experience many emotions, but in
    • your writing I want you to focus only on the facts, not on your emotions.
  • 1
    emotional disclosure writing intervention
    Intervention: Behavioral: Writing Intervention
  • 2
    control writing
    Intervention: Behavioral: Writing Intervention
Mosher CE, Duhamel KN, Lam J, Dickler M, Li Y, Massie MJ, Norton L. Randomised trial of expressive writing for distressed metastatic breast cancer patients. Psychol Health. 2012;27(1):88-100. doi: 10.1080/08870446.2010.551212. Epub 2011 Jul 8.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
98
January 2012
January 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Women with Stage IV breast cancer
  • Receiving cancer care at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
  • At least 18 years of age
  • Can speak, read, and write in English
  • In the judgment of consenting professionals able to provide informed consent
  • Score of 4 or higher on the distress thermometer (established cutoff score for probable distress; see Jacobsen et al., 2005)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Significant psychiatric or cognitive impairment (dementia/delirium, retardation, psychosis) that in the judgment of the investigators will preclude providing informed consent and participating in the intervention
  • Currently engaging in expressive writing (e.g., journal writing that involves expressing one's feelings) on a daily basis
  • Currently participating in intervention trials with similar endpoints • Male
Female
18 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00624156
08-011
Not Provided
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
  • National Cancer Institute (NCI)
  • Indiana University
Principal Investigator: Katherine DuHamel, PhD Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
January 2012

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP