Colorectal Cancer Screening Navigator Program for Low Income and Non-English Speaking Populations

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified April 2010 by Massachusetts General Hospital.
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Massachusetts General Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00476970
First received: May 21, 2007
Last updated: April 30, 2010
Last verified: April 2010

May 21, 2007
April 30, 2010
September 2007
September 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
percentage of eligible patients in study and control groups who undergo CRC screening during the study period [ Time Frame: 18 months ]
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00476970 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
- type of CRC screening test performed in study vs control groups - CRC screening stratified by English language proficiency and navigator contact - Identify barriers to screening and interventions used to achieve CRC screening goals [ Time Frame: 18 months ]
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Colorectal Cancer Screening Navigator Program for Low Income and Non-English Speaking Populations
Improving Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates by Lowering Barriers in Low Income and Non-English Speaking Populations: The Chelsea Colorectal Cancer Screening Project

The goal of this study is to implement and in a controlled randomised trial test a program to identify and overcome barriers to CRC screening and thus improve CRC screening rates at MGH Chelsea HC.

Our hypothesis is that a bilingual navigator program, enhanced by using trained interpreting staff will improve CRC screening rates at MGH Chelsea HC overall, and decrease disparities between patients with limited English proficiency and English speakers

We developed a training program for five health center interpreters fluent in eight different languages. Patients randomly assigned to the study intervention receive an introductory letter in their native language. During the initial contact the navigator educates patients about CRC screening and explores patients' barriers to CRC screening. Based on results from a qualitative study conducted at in 2006, we developed interventions to overcome individual barriers to CRC screening tailored to each individual patient. Specific interventions include elucidation of culturally-specific health beliefs; teaching about cancer risk, colonoscopy, and colon prep administration; and help with appointment-making and transport.

Interventional
Phase 1
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Screening
Colorectal Cancer Screening
Behavioral: multilingual navigator
Not Provided
Percac-Lima S, Grant RW, Green AR, Ashburner JM, Gamba G, Oo S, Richter JM, Atlas SJ. A culturally tailored navigator program for colorectal cancer screening in a community health center: a randomized, controlled trial. J Gen Intern Med. 2009 Feb;24(2):211-7.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
1400
September 2010
September 2010   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • patients between 52-79 years of age, have not had a colonoscopy within the last 10 years, sigmoidoscopy/barium enema within the past 5 years, or home fecal occult blood testing within the past year.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • acutely ill, currently receiving cancer treatment, or cognitively impaired
Both
52 Years to 79 Years
Yes
Contact: Sanja Percac-Lima, MD, PhD 617 889 8580 spercaclima@partners.org
United States
 
NCT00476970
2006P 002254
No
Sanja Percac-Lima, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital
Massachusetts General Hospital
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Sanja Percac-Lima, MD, PhD Massachusetts General Hospital
Massachusetts General Hospital
April 2010

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP