Comparison of Two Medications Aimed at Slowing Aortic Root Enlargement in Individuals With Marfan Syndrome--Pediatric Heart Network

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
National Marfan Foundation
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
New England Research Institutes
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00429364
First received: January 29, 2007
Last updated: April 9, 2014
Last verified: January 2014

January 29, 2007
April 9, 2014
January 2007
February 2014   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Rate of change in aortic root (sinuses of Valsalva) body-surface-area-adjusted Z-score [ Time Frame: Measured at Month 36 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Rate of change in aortic root (sinuses of Valsalva) body-surface-area-adjusted Z-score
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00429364 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Rate of change in aortic root (sinuses of Valsalva) absolute dimension [ Time Frame: Measured at Month 36 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Rate of change in ascending aorta and aortic annulus absolute dimension and body-surface-area-adjusted Z-score [ Time Frame: Measured at Month 36 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Rate of change of aortic and mitral regurgitation [ Time Frame: Measured at Month 36 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Time to first occurrence of aortic dissection, aortic root surgery, or death [ Time Frame: Measured at Month 36 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Rate of change in Z-scores for left ventricular size, wall thickness, and function by two-dimensional and M-mode echocardiography [ Time Frame: Measured at Month 36 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Rate of change of aortic root and ascending aortic elastic modulus and stiffness index [ Time Frame: Measured at Month 36 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Rate of change in Z-scores for somatic growth, where available [ Time Frame: Measured at Month 36 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Rate of change in weight and body mass index with covariate adjustment for age [ Time Frame: Measured at Month 36 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Incidence of adverse drug reactions reported during routine surveillance [ Time Frame: Measured at Month 36 ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
  • Rate of change in aortic root (sinuses of Valsalva) absolute dimension
  • Rate of change in ascending aorta and aortic annulus absolute dimension and body-surface-area-adjusted Z-score
  • Rate of change of aortic and mitral regurgitation
  • Aortic dissection, aortic root surgery, or death at 36 months after randomization
  • Time to first occurrence of aortic dissection, aortic root surgery, or death up to 36 months after randomization
  • Rate of change in Z-scores for left ventricular size, wall thickness, and function by two-dimensional and M-mode echocardiography
  • Rate of change of aortic root and ascending aortic elastic modulus and stiffness index
  • Rate of change in Z-scores for somatic growth, where available
  • Rate of change in weight and body mass index with covariate adjustment for age
  • Incidence of adverse drug reactions reported during routine surveillance
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Comparison of Two Medications Aimed at Slowing Aortic Root Enlargement in Individuals With Marfan Syndrome--Pediatric Heart Network
Trial of Beta Blocker Therapy (Atenolol) Versus Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker Therapy (Losartan) in Individuals With Marfan Syndrome (A Trial Conducted by the Pediatric Heart Network)

Marfan syndrome is a hereditary connective tissue disorder. Many individuals with this condition die because of the associated heart and blood vessel abnormalities. This study will compare the effectiveness of two medications, losartan and atenolol, at slowing aortic root enlargement in individuals with Marfan syndrome.

Marfan syndrome is an inheritable disorder that affects the body's connective tissue. An abnormal protein results in connective tissue that is weaker than normal. Because connective tissue is found throughout the body, Marfan syndrome can affect many body systems, including the skeleton, eyes, nervous system, skin, lungs, heart, and blood vessels. Overall, heart and blood vessel abnormalities are the leading cause of death in individuals with Marfan syndrome. A common blood vessel abnormality associated with this disease involves the aorta, which is the large artery that carries blood away from the heart to the rest of the body. The aortic root, the portion of the aorta that is attached to the heart, may enlarge and tear or even rupture. A tear or rupture is considered a life-threatening emergency. Recent studies have shown that the medication losartan may reduce aortic root growth and improve heart function. The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness of losartan versus atenolol at slowing aortic root growth in individuals with Marfan syndrome.

This 3-year study will enroll individuals with Marfan syndrome. Participants will be randomly assigned to receive either losartan or atenolol on a daily basis. All participants will initially receive a low dose of their assigned medication. This dose will be gradually increased every 3 to 4 weeks until the maximum tolerated dose is reached. A continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) that monitors heart rate and activity in 24-hour intervals will be used to determine the proper dose increase for each participant. Participants will then receive the maximum tolerated dose for the remainder of the study. Study visits will occur at baseline and Months 6, 12, 24, and 36. Each study visit will include a physical examination, a medical history review, an ECG, an echocardiogram, and questionnaires. Additionally, at the baseline study visit blood will be collected for laboratory testing.

Interventional
Phase 3
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Marfan Syndrome
  • Drug: Losartan Potassium
    Losartan .3 - 1.4 mg/kg
  • Drug: Atenolol
    Atenolol .5 - 4 mg/kg
  • Active Comparator: 1
    Atenolol
    Intervention: Drug: Atenolol
  • Active Comparator: 2
    Losartan
    Intervention: Drug: Losartan Potassium
Lacro RV, Guey LT, Dietz HC, Pearson GD, Yetman AT, Gelb BD, Loeys BL, Benson DW, Bradley TJ, De Backer J, Forbus GA, Klein GL, Lai WW, Levine JC, Lewin MB, Markham LW, Paridon SM, Pierpont ME, Radojewski E, Selamet Tierney ES, Sharkey AM, Wechsler SB, Mahony L; Pediatric Heart Network Investigators. Characteristics of children and young adults with Marfan syndrome and aortic root dilation in a randomized trial comparing atenolol and losartan therapy. Am Heart J. 2013 May;165(5):828-835.e3. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2013.02.019. Epub 2013 Mar 26.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
604
February 2014
February 2014   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Diagnosis of Marfan syndrome, according to Ghent criteria (more information can be found in Appendix D of the protocol)
  • Aortic root Z-score greater than 3.0

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Prior aortic surgery
  • Aortic root dimension at the sinuses of Valsalva greater than 5 cm
  • Planned aortic surgery within 6 months of study entry
  • Aortic dissection
  • Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome
  • Loeys-Dietz syndrome
  • Therapeutic (i.e., for arrhythmia, ventricular dysfunction, or valve regurgitation) rather than prophylactic use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, beta-blocker, or calcium channel blocker
  • History of angioedema while taking an ACE inhibitor or beta-blocker
  • Intolerance to losartan or other angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) that resulted in termination of therapy
  • Intolerance to atenolol or other beta-blocker that resulted in termination of therapy
  • Kidney dysfunction (i.e., creatinine greater than the upper limit of age-related normal values)
  • Asthma of sufficient severity to prohibit the use of a beta-blocker
  • Chronic use of steroids and/or beta-adrenergic agents with exacerbations of asthma that are frequent (averaging three or more per year) or severe (requiring hospitalization)
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Pregnant or planning to become pregnant within 36 months of study entry
  • Inability to complete study procedures, including history of poor acoustic windows (i.e., inability to obtain accurate measurement of aortic root)
Both
6 Months to 25 Years
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States,   Belgium,   Canada
 
NCT00429364
461, U01HL068270, U01 HL68270
Yes
New England Research Institutes
New England Research Institutes
  • National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
  • FDA Office of Orphan Products Development
  • National Marfan Foundation
Principal Investigator: Ron Lacro, MD Children's Hospital Boston
New England Research Institutes
January 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP