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Paclitaxel, Ifosfamide, and Carboplatin Followed By Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Germ Cell Tumors That Did Not Respond to Cisplatin

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00423852
First received: January 16, 2007
Last updated: February 6, 2013
Last verified: February 2013

January 16, 2007
February 6, 2013
August 2006
February 2013   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Response (complete and partial) [ Time Frame: 2 year ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Maximum tolerated dose of paclitaxel, carboplatin, and ifosfamide [ Time Frame: 2 year ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
  • Efficacy [ Time Frame: 2 year ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Safety [ Time Frame: 2 year ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
  • Response (complete and partial)
  • Maximum tolerated dose of ifosfamide
  • Efficacy
  • Safety
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00423852 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
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Paclitaxel, Ifosfamide, and Carboplatin Followed By Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Germ Cell Tumors That Did Not Respond to Cisplatin
Phase I/II Trial of Sequential Paclitaxel/Ifosfamide Followed by Dose-Escalated, Dose-Intensive Carboplatin, Paclitaxel and Ifosfamide With Stem Cell Support in Cisplatin-Resistant Germ Cell Tumor Patients

RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. An autologous peripheral stem cell transplant may be able to replace blood-forming cells that were destroyed by chemotherapy. This may allow more chemotherapy to be given so that more tumor cells are killed.

PURPOSE: This phase I/II trial is studying the side effects and best dose of ifosfamide when given together with paclitaxel and carboplatin followed by an autologous stem cell transplant and to see how well they work in treating patients with germ cell tumors that did not respond to cisplatin.

OBJECTIVES:

  • Determine the safety of paclitaxel and ifosfamide followed by dose-escalated, dose-intensive paclitaxel, carboplatin, and ifosfamide with autologous peripheral blood stem cell support in patients with cisplatin-resistant germ cell tumor. (Phase I)
  • Determine the maximum tolerated dose of paclitaxel, carboplatin, and ifosfamide when given with a high-dose treatment program in these patients. (Phase I)
  • Determine the efficacy of this regimen when given as salvage therapy in the second-line or third-line setting, in terms of complete response, in these patients. (Phase II)

OUTLINE: This is a phase I, dose-escalation study of paclitaxel, carboplatin, and ifosfamide followed by a phase II, open-label study.

  • Phase I:

    • Paclitaxel, ifosfamide, and autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collection: Patients receive paclitaxel IV over 3 hours on day 1 and ifosfamide IV over 2 hours on days 1-3. Patients undergo leukapheresis on days 11-13. Patients also receive filgrastim (G-CSF) subcutaneously (SC) twice daily beginning on day 3 and continuing until leukapheresis is completed. Beginning on day 14 or 21, patients may receive a second course of paclitaxel, ifosfamide, and G-CSF. Patients may also undergo additional leukapheresis.
    • Paclitaxel, carboplatin, ifosfamide, and autologous PBSC transplantation: Patients receive paclitaxel IV over 3 hours, high-dose carboplatin IV over 30 minutes, and ifosfamide IV over 4 hours on days 1-3. Patients also receive G-CSF SC beginning on day 3 and continuing until blood counts recover. Patients undergo reinfusion of autologous PBSCs on day 5. Treatment repeats every 21-28 days for 3 courses in the absence of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

Cohorts of 3-6 patients receive escalating doses of paclitaxel, carboplatin, and ifosfamide until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is determined. The MTD is defined as the dose preceding that at which 2 of 3 or 2 of 6 patients experience dose-limiting toxicity.

  • Phase II: Patients receive treatment as in phase I with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and ifosfamide at the MTD determined in phase I.

After completion of study treatment, patients are followed periodically for 1 year and then annually thereafter.

Interventional
Phase 1
Phase 2
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors
  • Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor
  • Ovarian Cancer
  • Teratoma
  • Testicular Germ Cell Tumor
  • Biological: filgrastim
  • Drug: carboplatin
  • Drug: ifosfamide
  • Drug: paclitaxel
  • Procedure: autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
  • Procedure: peripheral blood stem cell transplantation
Experimental: chemotherapy with Stem Cell Support
This is a phase I/II trial of sequential accelerated chemotherapy cycles with paclitaxel/ifosfamide and paclitaxel/ifosfamide and carboplatin administered with G-CSF and PBSC support. During phase I, carboplatin, ifosfamide, and paclitaxel will be dose escalated to determine the MTD. Additional patients will be enrolled in the Phase II portion of the study following the determination of the MTD of Ifosfamide and paclitaxel, to bring the total possible number of patients treated at the MTD to 38.
Interventions:
  • Biological: filgrastim
  • Drug: carboplatin
  • Drug: ifosfamide
  • Drug: paclitaxel
  • Procedure: autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
  • Procedure: peripheral blood stem cell transplantation
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
26
February 2013
February 2013   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

DISEASE CHARACTERISTICS:

  • Histologically confirmed germ cell tumor (GCT)

    • Primary CNS GCT allowed
  • Unidimensionally measurable disease OR elevated serum tumor markers (alpha-fetoprotein and/or human chorionic gonadotropin)
  • Advanced disease

    • Disease resistant to a cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimen (i.e., failed to achieve a durable complete response to cisplatin)
  • Known residual disease after post-chemotherapy surgery allowed

PATIENT CHARACTERISTICS:

  • Platelet count ≥ 100,000/mm^3
  • WBC ≥ 3,000/mm^3
  • Creatinine clearance > 50 mL/min (unless due to tumor obstructing the ureters)
  • AST and ALT < 2 times upper limit of normal (ULN)
  • Bilirubin < 1.5 times ULN
  • Not pregnant or nursing
  • Negative pregnancy test
  • Fertile patients must use effective contraception
  • No active infection
  • Negative serology for HIV type I and II, human T-lymphotropic virus type I and II, hepatitis B or C virus, syphilis, and cytomegalovirus

    • Hepatitis C negative serology by RIBA or PCR
  • Adequate medical condition for general anesthesia

PRIOR CONCURRENT THERAPY:

  • See Disease Characteristics
  • Recovered from recent surgery
  • At least 3 weeks since prior chemotherapy
  • No prior high-dose therapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation
  • No other concurrent chemotherapy
  • No other concurrent treatment (e.g., surgery or radiotherapy)
Both
18 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00423852
06-077, MSKCC-06077
Not Provided
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Principal Investigator: Darren Feldman, MD Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
February 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP