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Improving Adherence to Oral Antipsychotic Medications in People With Schizophrenia

This study is ongoing, but not recruiting participants.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Dawn Velligan, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00406718
First received: November 30, 2006
Last updated: April 5, 2013
Last verified: April 2013

November 30, 2006
April 5, 2013
November 2006
July 2013   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Adherence [ Time Frame: Measured at Months 4, 7, and 10 and at Year 5 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS) scores [ Time Frame: Measured at Months 4, 7, and 10 and at Year 5 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Measured at Months 4, 7, and 10: Adherence
  • Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS) scores
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00406718 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Schizophrenia symptoms [ Time Frame: Measured at Months 4, 7, and 10 and at Year 5 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Functioning [ Time Frame: Measured at Months 4, 7, and 10 and at Year 5 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Treatment outcome [ Time Frame: Measured at Months 4, 7, and 10 and at Year 5 ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • Measured at Months 4, 7, and 10: Schizophrenia symptoms
  • Functioning
  • Treatment outcome
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Improving Adherence to Oral Antipsychotic Medications in People With Schizophrenia
Interventions for Adherence to Oral Antipsychotic Medications in Schizophrenia

This study will determine the comparative effectiveness of two systems designed to improve medication adherence in people with schizophrenia.

Schizophrenia is a severely debilitating mental disorder. People with schizophrenia often experience unusual thoughts or perceptions, decreased pleasure in everyday life, and difficulty functioning in social situations. Antipsychotic medications have been shown to be effective in improving the symptoms of schizophrenia. Poor adherence to medication, however, leads to re-hospitalization, impedes the process of recovery, and contributes to the high costs associated with schizophrenia treatment. Studies have shown that PharmCAT, cognitive adaptive training that specifically targets medication adherence, has been effective in improving adherence and outcomes in people with schizophrenia. The Med-eMonitor™ is a new pill device that is able to alert patients when they should take medication, when they are taking the wrong medication, and when they are taking medication at the wrong time. The device can also record side effect complaints and then send stored information to treatment staff. The capabilities of the Med-eMonitor™ eliminate the need for the weekly home visits that are necessary in the PharmCAT program, and may make treatment more easily available to individuals in remote or rural settings. This study will compare the effectiveness of PharmCAT, the Med-eMonitor™, and standard treatment in improving medication adherence and treatment outcome in people with schizophrenia.

Participants in this study will be randomly assigned to one of the following treatment groups: (1) PharmCAT; (2) the Med-eMonitor™; or (3) standard treatment. Participants in Group 1 will receive weekly home visits from a case manager. These visits will specifically target medication adherence. Participants in Group 2 will use the Med-eMonitor™ device. Data recorded by the device will be sent electronically to study staff. Participants in Group 3 will keep the Med-eMonitor™ device in their homes throughout the study but will not use its medication reminder function. The device will record only when medication is taken. All participants will report to the study site at study entry and Months 4, 7, and 10 for measures of symptoms, functioning, social activities, and relationships.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • Schizophrenia
  • Schizoaffective Disorder
  • Device: Med-eMonitor Device
    Participants will use the Med-eMonitor™ device, which is an electronic device that holds up to one month's supply of up to five medications. It is capable of cueing the taking of medication, warning patients when they are taking the wrong medication or taking it at the wrong time, recording side effect complaints, and through modem hookup promptly alerting treatment staff of failures to take medication as prescribed.
  • Procedure: PharmCAT Therapy
    Pharm CAT is a psychosocial intervention using environmental supports such as signs, alarms, checklists, and special medication containers to cue and sequence adaptive behavior in the patient's home environment. This treatment specifically targets adherence to medication, medication education, and orientation for patients with schizophrenia. Participants will receive weekly home visits from a case manager.
  • Behavioral: Standard treatment
    Participants receiving standard treatment will keep the Med-eMonitor™ device in their homes throughout the study but will not use its medication reminder function.
  • Experimental: 1
    Participants will receive PharmCAT
    Intervention: Procedure: PharmCAT Therapy
  • Active Comparator: 2
    Participants will receive the Med-eMonitor™
    Intervention: Device: Med-eMonitor Device
  • Active Comparator: 3
    Participants will receive standard treatment
    Intervention: Behavioral: Standard treatment
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Active, not recruiting
150
July 2013
July 2013   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder according to DSM-IV criteria, as determined on the basis of the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnosis (SCID-P)
  • Receiving treatment with an oral atypical antipsychotic medication other than clozapine (e.g., risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole, ziprasidone, or others as they are FDA approved)
  • Assumes some responsibility for taking own medications
  • Able to provide evidence of a stable living environment (e.g., individual apartment, family home, or board and care facility) within 3 months prior to study entry and no plans to move in the next year
  • Intact visual and auditory ability as determined by a computerized screening battery
  • Ability to read at the 5th grade level or higher based upon score on the Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT)
  • Able to understand and complete rating scales and neuropsychological testing
  • Working telephone present in the home

Exclusion Criteria:

  • History of significant head trauma, seizure disorder, or mental retardation
  • Alcohol or drug abuse or dependence within 3 months prior to study entry
  • Currently being treated by an assertive community treatment (ACT) team
  • History of violence within 1 year prior to study entry
  • Any hospitalizations within 3 months prior to study entry
Both
18 Years to 60 Years
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00406718
R01 MH074047, DAHBR 96-BHA
No
Dawn Velligan, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Dawn I. Velligan, PhD The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA)
The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
April 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP