Acetaminophen Concentration in Cerebrospinal Fluid in Infants

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Assaf-Harofeh Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00389454
First received: October 17, 2006
Last updated: October 30, 2007
Last verified: August 2006

October 17, 2006
October 30, 2007
January 2004
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00389454 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Acetaminophen Concentration in Cerebrospinal Fluid in Infants
Acetaminophen Concentration in Cerebrospinal Fluid in Infants

Acetaminophen is the most commonly used drug in children. Inhibition of COX-3 in the brain has been suggested as the primary central mechanism by which acetaminophen decrease pain and possibly fever. However there is very limited data about acetaminophen concentrations in the brain and no such data is available for newborns. The objective of the current study is to describe concentrations of acetaminophen in the fluid around the brain of infants after administration of acetaminophen.

The mechanism by which acetaminophen causes analgesia and antipyretic effect is not entirely clear. Recently a new COX isoenzyme was identified and termed COX 3. In humans this isoenzyme is most abundant in cerebral cortex and heart. Inhibition of COX-3 could represent a primary central mechanism by which acetaminophen decrease pain and possibly fever (10). An effect on of acetaminophen on presynaptic 5-HT(2) receptors in the hypocampus has been demonstrated (11) suggesting again that the primary effect of acetaminophen is in the CNS.

Many studies (12-16) described the pharmacokinetics of oral and rectal acetaminophen in infants and neonates. Yet, the data on acetaminophen concentrations in the CSF is very limited. Two studies in adults (17;18) used intravenous propacetamol and described concentrations of acetaminophen in the plasma and CSF. Acetaminophen was detected as early as 15 minutes after the administration and reached peak concentrations in the CSF at the 4th hour. A small study (19) of nine children who had indwelling ventricular drains found that cerebrospinal fluid concentrations lagged behind those of plasma with an equilibration half time of 0.72 h. This study did not describe CSF concentrations in neonates and used a dose of 40mg/kg, which is higher than the recommended dose in children. To the best of our knowledge there is no data on acetaminophen CSF concentrations in neonates.

The objective of the current study is to describe concentrations of acetaminophen in the CSF of infants after single administration of acetaminophen. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen and its penetration into the CSF will enable us to better predict the effects of this commonly used drug.

Observational
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Fever
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
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June 2007
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Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age: 1week - 2 years
  • Rectal temperature > 38.0OC
  • A sepsis work up is indicated
  • Acetaminophen was given prior to lumbar puncture (LP)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Hypersensitivity to acetaminophen
  • Known metabolic disorder
  • Known liver or kidney disease
  • Hydrocephalus
  • Informed consent could not be obtained from a legal guardian
Both
up to 2 Years
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Israel
 
NCT00389454
93/03
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Assaf-Harofeh Medical Center
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Principal Investigator: Eran Kozer, MD Assaf-Harofeh Medical Center
Assaf-Harofeh Medical Center
August 2006

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP