Emergency Pharmacist Safety Study

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by:
University of Rochester
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00382434
First received: September 27, 2006
Last updated: January 13, 2010
Last verified: January 2010

September 27, 2006
January 13, 2010
August 2005
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00382434 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Emergency Pharmacist Safety Study
The ED Pharmacist as a Safety Measure in Emergency Medicine

The Emergency Department (ED) is a unique environment in medicine, and many safety mechanisms used in other hospital settings cannot be applied in the ED. For example, clinical pharmacists have traditionally provided extra layers of protection to hospital inpatients by cross-checking provider orders for appropriate dosing, contraindications, and interactions. Because medications in the ED must be accessed immediately and are often one-time doses, the use of central pharmacy services would introduce an unacceptable delay to the administration of medication. Although some hospitals have programs in place in which a pharmacist responds to the ED for cardiac arrests or trauma team activations, few have reported programs which involve a clinical pharmacist assigned exclusively to the emergency department. Nonetheless, published reports have asserted that ED-based pharmacists can increase patient safety. Although this concept appears logical, no study has attempted to show that these programs reduce potential adverse drug events in the ED. We propose to implement and optimize an ED Pharmacist (EDP) program as a safe practice intervention in a large ED. The hospital has provided funding for two permanent full time positions starting at the beginning of the award period. In the initial phase interviews of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and patients will be conducted and the results will be used to optimize the EDP role. A large-scale chart review study will then be conducted to evaluate whether there is a reduction in frequency of potential and adverse drug events during times that the EDP is on duty. Staff perceptions of the effectiveness of this program will also be evaluated. The overall goal of this initiative is to create an effective EDP program that will decrease the rate of adverse drug events in ED patients, and to create a "toolkit" to facilitate the introduction of similar programs into other EDs. This toolkit will include a description of the formal, optimized role of the EDP, challenges and solutions in implementation, and evidence to support the efficacy of such a program.

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Observational
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Probability Sample

emergency department patients

Adverse Drug Event, Potential Adverse Drug Event, and Quality Measures
Procedure: presence of an emergency pharmacist in the ED
EPh Present
the emergency pharmacist is present in the ED when the medical care is provided
Intervention: Procedure: presence of an emergency pharmacist in the ED
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
10224
December 2006
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Inclusion Criteria:

  • pediatric (less than 19), geriatric (>64), or critically ill (all ages)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • investigator involved or incomplete chart
Both
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Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00382434
1U18HS015818, RSRB #11834
No
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University of Rochester
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)
Principal Investigator: Rollin J Fairbanks, MD, MS University of Rochester
University of Rochester
January 2010

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP