Use of Mindfulness Meditation With Iraqi/Afghanistan War Veterans

This study has been withdrawn prior to enrollment.
(protocol revisions were deemed unable to be completed by 8/2007)
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Samueli Institute for Information Biology
University of Pennsylvania
Information provided by:
Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00375531
First received: September 12, 2006
Last updated: October 9, 2007
Last verified: October 2007

September 12, 2006
October 9, 2007
October 2006
Not Provided
  • Sleep & PTSD SYMPTOM SEVERITY -- (measured by) Actigraphy, PTSD Checklist (PCL), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ),Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) -- Self-report measures and actigraphy readings will be
  • collected at baseline, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks in
  • both groups.
  • Self-report measures and actigraphy readings will be
  • collected at baseline, eight weeks, and 12 weeks in
  • both groups. Sleep and PTSD symptom severity
  • are the primary endpoints of the study.
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00375531 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
PSYCHOLOGICAL WELLNESS ASSESSMENTS -- (measured by) Life Orientation Test (LOT), Perceived Wellness Survey (PWS), Spirituality Assessment Scale (SAS)
  • Secondary measures include other mood states
  • and perceived psychological wellness.
  • The PTSD Checklist , Functional Outcomes
  • of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ), Profile of
  • Mood States (POMS), and the psychological
  • wellness battery of assessments will be
  • used to measure the endpoints.
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Use of Mindfulness Meditation With Iraqi/Afghanistan War Veterans
Use of Mindfulness Meditation With Iraqi/Afghanistan War Veterans With Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Objectives: The primary objective of this study is to conduct a randomized pilot study on the efficacy of Mindfulness Meditation (MfM) on sleep in post war Iraqi/Afghanistan veterans with PTSD. It is hypothesized that the change in sleep (measured by actigraphy), sleep self report measures, and PTSD symptoms (measured by the PTSD Checklist) from baseline, 8 weeks and 12 weeks will be greater for veterans with PTSD who are treated with MfM, controlling for pretreatment values and other clinical and demographic factors.

A secondary objective will investigate whether there is an improvement in psychological wellness (measured by optimism, perceived wellness, and spirituality) following MfM treatments.

It is hypothesized that change in optimism, perceived wellness, and spirituality from baseline, 8 weeks and 12 weeks will improve in veterans with PTSD who are treated with MfM, controlling for pretreatment values and other clinical and demographic factors. Physiological measures of actigraphy in the home will be done at baseline, eight weeks, and twelve weeks. Subjective measure of sleep include measurements of sleep and quality of life(FOSQ) and subjective sleep quality (PSQI). Other self-report measures that will examine psychological wellness include the Life Orientation Test (LOT), the Perceived Wellness Survey (PWS) and the Spirituality Assessment Scale (SAS).

Research Design: This exploratory study is a randomized, controlled, repeated measures trial to estimate the effectiveness of mindfulness meditation (MfM) to improve the severity of PTSD symptoms, specifically sleep and anxiety, and to improve the psychological wellbeing in Iraqi veterans with PTSD. The study is a repeated measures, comparative study using a parallel design. Both groups will receive routine treatment for PTSD; in addition, the treatment group will receive 8 weeks (1.5 hours/week) of mindfulness meditation from a trained psychologist, (Co-PI, N Chychula) who has been conducting these mindfulness meditation groups with combat veterans for 3 years. Subjects will be asked to commit to practice mindfulness meditation practice for 45 minutes each day. Data will be collected at baseline, eight weeks, and twelve weeks (one month follow-up). An equal number of participants will be randomly assigned to each group with 15 assigned to each group.

Methodology: For purposes of this pilot study, mindfulness meditation will be delivered in the context of a structured manual driven program, developed to enhance awareness of moment-to-moment experience of perceived mental processes. Although rooted in Buddhist traditions, this program is not religious but aims to create a greater awareness of body sensations, feelings and thoughts. This is thought to allow greater perception of one's responses and a gradual reduction in negative affect accompanied by an improvement in vitality and coping and psychological wellbeing (Grossman, 2004).

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double-Blind
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • PTSD
  • Stress
Behavioral: Mindfulness Meditation (MfM)
Not Provided
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Withdrawn
40
August 2007
Not Provided

INCLUSION CRITERIA:

  • Iraqi War veterans who have returned from deployment for at least 3 months
  • The veterans must be willing to practice MfM for 45 minutes each day and agree to follow all treatment protocols.

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

Patients with a documented diagnosis of:

  • a thought disorder
  • a bipolar disorder
  • a borderline personality disorder
  • active substance abuse/dependence,

Patients that are:

  • homeless
  • have pending legal dispositions
  • are unable to hear, read, visualize, and/or comprehend the assessment
Both
18 Years to 55 Years
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00375531
MIRB ID #00890, USUHS #PA181BO-4
Not Provided
Not Provided
Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center
  • Samueli Institute for Information Biology
  • University of Pennsylvania
Principal Investigator: Nina M Chychula, Ph.D. Philadelphia VAMC and University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center
October 2007

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP