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Computer-Based Training in Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT4CBT)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Yale University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00350610
First received: July 7, 2006
Last updated: January 28, 2013
Last verified: January 2013

July 7, 2006
January 28, 2013
November 2007
December 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
reduction in drug use [ Time Frame: 8 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • reduction in drug use
  • retention in treatment
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00350610 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • patients ability to demonstrate coping skills through a computerized role-playing evaluation [ Time Frame: 8 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
  • retention in treatment [ Time Frame: 8 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
patients ability to demonstrate coping skills through a role-playing evaluation
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Computer-Based Training in Cognitive Behavior Therapy
Computer-Based Training in Cognitive Behavior Therapy

The computer-based training program (CBT for CBT) focuses on teaching basic coping skills, presenting examples of effective use of coping skills in a number of realistic situations in video form, and providing opportunities for patients to practice and review new skills while receiving substance abuse treatment.

In this behavioral trial 120 methadone maintained cocaine abusing individuals will be randomly assigned to either treatment as usual in a community-based clinic OR treatment as usual plus 8 hours of access to the 'CBT for CBT' computer program over a period of 8 weeks. Primary outcomes will be retention in treatment and reduction in cocaine use (percent days abstinent, confirmed by urine toxicology screens). The patients' ability to demonstrate coping skills through a computerized role-play evaluation will be a secondary outcome. A six-month follow-up will assess durability and/or delayed emergence of effects.

Interventional
Phase 1
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Cocaine Abuse
  • Other: Treatment as usual (TAU)
    Standard treatment as usual in a community based treatment setting
  • Behavioral: CBT for CBT
    Standard treatment as usual (TAU) plus computer based therapy using CBT
  • Active Comparator: 1
    Standard treatment as usual (TAU) in a community based clinic consisting of individual and group therapy sessions and regular urine monitoring.
    Intervention: Other: Treatment as usual (TAU)
  • Experimental: 2
    Standard treatment as usual (TAU) plus coping skills computer program. In addition to the individual and group therapy sessions (TAU), individuals will work with a computerized program that teaches skills for stopping cocaine use and increasing coping skills twice weekly for 8 weeks.
    Interventions:
    • Other: Treatment as usual (TAU)
    • Behavioral: CBT for CBT

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
100
December 2012
December 2012   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 18 years and older
  • methadone maintained for at least 3 months
  • meet current DSM-IV criteria for cocaine use disorder
  • fluent in English or at least a6th grade reading level
  • can commit to at least 8 weeks of treatment and willing to be randomized to treatment

Exclusion Criteria:

  • untreated bipolar or schizophrenic disorder
  • current legal case pending (pending incarceration during 8 weeks of study)
Both
18 Years and older
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00350610
0207017894, DA015969
Yes
Yale University
Yale University
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Principal Investigator: Kathleen Carroll, PhD Yale University/Department of Psychiatry
Yale University
January 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP