Liposomal Doxorubicin Before Mastectomy in Treating Women With Invasive Breast Cancer

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00290732
First received: February 9, 2006
Last updated: October 7, 2013
Last verified: October 2013

February 9, 2006
October 7, 2013
November 2005
May 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) [ Time Frame: Until up to 30 days after PLD administration ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
Maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of administering pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) into one duct of women with breast cancer awaiting mastectomy. MTD reflects highest dose of drug that did not cause Dose Limiting Toxicity (DLT) in more than 30% of patients.
Not Provided
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00290732 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Concentrations of Doxorubicin in Blood (Plasma) at Definitive Surgery [ Time Frame: Baseline, 4 hrs, day2/24 hrs, day 8, day of surgery/biopsy ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Due to the limited number of samples and detectable levels, the maximum concentration of doxorubicin in blood (plasma) across all the participants in each group is reported.
  • Concentrations of Doxorubicin in Tissue at Definitive Surgery [ Time Frame: Day of surgery/biopsy ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Due to the limited number of samples and detectable levels, the maximum concentration of doxorubicin in tissue across all the participants in each group is reported.
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Liposomal Doxorubicin Before Mastectomy in Treating Women With Invasive Breast Cancer
A Phase I Study Assessing the Feasibility and Safety of Intraductal Administration of Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin (Doxil) in Women With Breast Cancer

RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as liposomal doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving chemotherapy in different ways, such as into the breast ducts, may kill more tumor cells. Giving chemotherapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.

PURPOSE: This phase I trial is studying the side effects and best dose of liposomal doxorubicin when given before mastectomy in treating women with invasive breast cancer.

OBJECTIVES:

Primary

  • Evaluate the feasibility, safety, and maximum tolerated dose of intraductal pegylated doxorubicin HCl liposome in women with invasive breast cancer awaiting mastectomy.

Secondary

  • Determine the pharmacokinetics of intraductal pegylated doxorubicin HCl liposome, including serial plasma concentrations of doxorubicin and doxorubicinol and tissue concentrations in different portions of the breast at the time of surgery.

OUTLINE: This is a dose-escalation study.

Patients receive an intraductal injection of pegylated doxorubicin HCl liposome* on day 1. Patients undergo mastectomy 2-4 weeks later.

Cohorts of 3-6 patients receive escalating doses of pegylated doxorubicin HCl liposome* until the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is determined. The MTD is defined as the dose preceding that at which 2 of 3 or 2 of 6 patients experience dose-limiting toxicity. At least 6 patients are treated at the MTD.

NOTE: *The first cohort of 3 patients receive intraductal dextrose only followed by surgery as a feasibility study. An additional 3 patients receiving intravenous PLD will be enrolled in a pharmacokinetic control portion of the study.

Interventional
Phase 1
Allocation: Non-Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Breast Cancer
  • Drug: Intraductal arm
    Patients will receive PLD intraductally according to the dose escalation schema (Dose Level -1=1 mg, Dose Level 1=2 mg, Dose Level 2= 5mg, Dose Level 3=10 mg). The PLD dose will be diluted in 5% dextrose in water and will be mixed for a total volume of 5 ml. The PLD will be administered via a breast duct (i.e., intraductally) using a microcatheter
    Other Name: Doxorubicin HCl Liposome Injection, Dox-SL, Doxil TM
  • Drug: Intravenous arm
    Blood samples and a breast tissue biopsy collected to look at levels of doxorubincol from patients receiving intravenous pegylated liposomal doxorubin to compare to the group receiving drug intraductally.
    Other Name: Doxorubicin HCl Liposome Injection, Dox-SL, Doxil TM
  • Experimental: Intraductal arm
    Participants received intraductal administration of dextrose or dextrose with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride (or PLD) prior to conventional surgery for breast cancer.
    Intervention: Drug: Intraductal arm
  • Active Comparator: Intravenous arm
    Participants receiving standard intravenous administration of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin prior to breast biopsy for drug concentrations.
    Intervention: Drug: Intravenous arm
Stearns V, Mori T, Jacobs LK, Khouri NF, Gabrielson E, Yoshida T, Kominsky SL, Huso DL, Jeter S, Powers P, Tarpinian K, Brown RJ, Lange JR, Rudek MA, Zhang Z, Tsangaris TN, Sukumar S. Preclinical and clinical evaluation of intraductally administered agents in early breast cancer. Sci Transl Med. 2011 Oct 26;3(106):106ra108. doi: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3002368.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
20
October 2011
May 2011   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

DISEASE CHARACTERISTICS:

  • Histologically confirmed infiltrating carcinoma of the breast meeting any of the following criteria:

    • T1-3, any N disease
    • Proven ductal carcinoma in situ
  • Unresected disease

    • Planned mastectomy as definitive surgical procedure

      • Known or suspected metastatic disease allowed provided mastectomy is planned
  • Nonpalpable tumor allowed (e.g., initial T2-3 tumor that responded to preoperative therapy)
  • No inflammatory breast cancer or other T4 features
  • Successful baseline ductogram

    • Baseline nipple aspiration procedure must identify a duct productive of nipple aspirate fluid
    • No severe nipple retraction
  • Hormone receptor status not specified

PATIENT CHARACTERISTICS:

  • Female patients
  • Menopausal status not specified
  • ECOG performance status 0-2
  • Absolute neutrophil count ≥1,500/mm^3
  • Platelet count ≥ 100,000/mm^3
  • Hemoglobin ≥ 9.0 g/dL
  • Creatinine ≤ 2 times upper limit of normal (ULN)
  • Bilirubin ≤ 2 times ULN
  • AST and ALT ≤ 2.5 times ULN
  • Not pregnant or nursing
  • Negative pregnancy test
  • Fertile patients must use effective contraception
  • No significant history of severe allergy to iodinated contrast material or debilitating anxiety that may not allow for a ductogram

PRIOR CONCURRENT THERAPY:

  • See Disease Characteristics
  • Prior preoperative chemotherapy, trastuzumab (Herceptin®), or hormonal therapy allowed provided it was completed 7-14 days prior to study treatment
  • No prior radiation therapy, excisional biopsy, breast reduction, areolar surgery, or breast implant (present or past history of implant that was removed)
  • No other prior procedure that may have altered the breast ductal system in the ipsilateral breast
  • No other concurrent chemotherapy, radiotherapy, endocrine therapy, or biologic agents for breast cancer
  • No other concurrent investigational drugs
  • Concurrent bisphosphonates allowed
Female
18 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00290732
J0503 CDR0000459502, P30CA006973, JHOC-J0503
No
Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center
Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Study Chair: Vered Stearns, MD Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center
Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center
October 2013

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP