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Development of a Hospital Service That Uses Critical Pathway (Protocolized) Care Plans to Provide High-Quality, High-Reliability, Evidence-Based Medical Care

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Mayo Clinic
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00275587
First received: January 10, 2006
Last updated: March 21, 2011
Last verified: March 2011

January 10, 2006
March 21, 2011
January 2005
January 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00275587 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Development of a Hospital Service That Uses Critical Pathway (Protocolized) Care Plans to Provide High-Quality, High-Reliability, Evidence-Based Medical Care
Development of Critical Pathway Care for Hospitalized Patients Using Principles of Patient-Centered Quality Care, Evidence-Based Medicine, and High Reliability Organizational Structure

Our broad, long-term objective is to create a new non-resident (non-teaching) hospital service that uses patient-centered critical pathway care plans for treating patients in St. Marys Hospital. This innovative service, the Hospital Medicine (HOME) Team, will integrate three timely, high-priority concepts in healthcare: patient-centered quality care, evidence-based medicine, and principles that define high reliability organizations. The target populations for the new model of service are patients hospitalized with pre-defined admission diagnoses who are expected to require only a brief, focused hospital stay of four days or less. Specifically, we will 1) Design the prototypical approach to be used for developing all critical pathway care plans by integrating patient-centered quality care, evidence-based medicine, and principles that define high reliability organizations, 2) Systematically design the critical pathway care plans for two pre-defined admission diagnoses (community-acquired pneumonia and non-surgical low-back pain), and 3) Compare outcomes of this new service against respective historical patient cohorts for patients admitted with community-acquired pneumonia and non-surgical low-back pain. We anticipate that the prototypic methodology used to develop this patient-centered service will be replicated for other new hospital-service models. To our knowledge, there are currently no existing hospital services in the U.S. that have intentionally integrated principles of high reliability organizations into evidence-based critical pathways founded on patient-centered principles of uncompromising quality.

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Observational
Time Perspective: Retrospective
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Non-Probability Sample

Patients hospitalized at St. Marys Hospital in Rochester, MN with with one of six medical diagnoses: community-acquired pneumonia, deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, cellulitis, alcohol withdrawal, pyelonephritis, low back pain.

Critical Pathways
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
348
January 2008
January 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  1. Hospitalized patient with one of six medical diagnoses: community-acquired pneumonia, deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, cellulitis, alcohol withdrawal, pyelonephritis, low back pain.
  2. Ability and agreement to consent.
Both
18 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00275587
164-05
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A. Scott Keller, Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic
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Principal Investigator: A. Scott Keller, M.D. Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic
March 2011

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP