Schizophrenia, Antipsychotic Treatment and the Risk for Diabetes Mellitus

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified February 2011 by University of Pittsburgh.
Recruitment status was  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry
Janssen Pharmaceuticals
Information provided by:
University of Pittsburgh
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00222807
First received: September 13, 2005
Last updated: February 16, 2011
Last verified: February 2011

September 13, 2005
February 16, 2011
August 2003
December 2013   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
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Not Provided
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00222807 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
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Schizophrenia, Antipsychotic Treatment and the Risk for Diabetes Mellitus
Schizophrenia, Antipsychotic Treatment and the Risk for Diabetes Mellitus

This preliminary study aims to investigate the mechanism of higher rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with schizophrenia. As part of the study, we collect neuroendocrine-immune data on patients with first episode, treatment naive psychosis, patients with newly diagnosed schizophrenia and normal healthy controls.

Regardless the treatment status, we collect the same neuroendocrine-immune data on the participants after 2 months.

This preliminary study aims to investigate the mechanism of higher rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients with schizophrenia. As part of the study, we collect neuroendocrine-immune data on patients with first episode, treatment naive psychosis, patients with newly diagnosed schizophrenia and normal healthy controls.

Regardless the treatment status, we collect the same neuroendocrine-immune on the participants (patients and controls) after 2 months. Thus, our study does not control treatment. Patients take treatment in consultation with their physician. Some of them even decide not to take any medications. At the 2nd visit, we do ask them about the the medications they are taking if any.

Observational
Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Prospective
Not Provided
Retention:   Samples Without DNA
Description:

blood samples are collected, stored at minus 70 degree C and analyzed in batches.

Probability Sample

Patients with psychosis

  • Schizophrenia
  • Schizoaffective Disorder
  • Delusional Disorder
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
200
June 2014
December 2013   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Psychotic disorder as per DSM-IV criteria of the American Psychiatric Association

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Diabetes, type 1 or 2
  • Prominent substance abuse (i.e. psychotic symptoms attributable entirely to substance use)
  • Age above 50 or age below 14
Both
14 Years to 50 Years
Yes
Contact: Ripu D Jindal, MD 412 512 9516 jindalr@upmc.edu
United States
 
NCT00222807
0306110
Yes
Ripu Jindal, MD Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Pittsburgh
University of Pittsburgh
  • American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry
  • Janssen Pharmaceuticals
Principal Investigator: Ripu D Jindal, MD University of Pittsburgh
University of Pittsburgh
February 2011

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP