Examining Physician Counseling to Promote Adoption of Physical Activity: A Controlled Trial

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada
Information provided by:
University of Saskatchewan
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00204399
First received: September 12, 2005
Last updated: NA
Last verified: May 2000
History: No changes posted

September 12, 2005
September 12, 2005
July 2001
Not Provided
The primary outcome measures include possible differences in levels of self-reported physical activity.
Same as current
No Changes Posted
In addition, several behavioral predictors typically associated with physical activity will be assessed (e.g., self-efficacy, social support, anticipated benefits & enjoyment, and barriers).
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Examining Physician Counseling to Promote Adoption of Physical Activity: A Controlled Trial
Examining Physician Counseling to Promote Adoption of Physical Activity: A Controlled Trial

The purpose of this study is to systematically test the efficacy of two physician-based interventions in changing physical activity patterns of adults over a 20-month period.

Although physicians typically counsel for other risk factors of CVD, they are less likely to counsel for increasing levels of physical activity. This is surprising for two reasons: First, physical activity has been identified as an independent modifiable risk factor for CVD. Second, there is a high prevalence of physical inactivity among Canadians. The purpose of the current study is to examine interventions that are designed to promote adoption and maintenance of physical activity through physician recommendations and counseling. The primary outcome measures include possible differences in levels of self-reported physical activity. In addition, several behavioral predictors typically associated with physical activity will be assessed (e.g., self-efficacy, social support, anticipated benefits & enjoyment, and barriers). There are several unique aspects to this research including: 1) the fact that it compares two types of delivery systems 2) the examination of physical activity patterns over an extended period of time has not been done previously with this type of intervention, and as such, also forms another unique feature of this proposal 3) physician intervention for physical activity has not been done in Canada previously. If the intervention is found effective, the program will add significant value to health services in Saskatchewan and Canada. For instance, the program will enhance the role of physicians in promoting physical activity without increasing the cost of health-care delivery, and with a minimal investment of time required by the physician and his/her staff.

Comparison: To assess the efficacy of the interventions, a quasi experimental design will compare an intervention with a standard control condition. All physicians will be trained to use a standardized protocol to deliver PACE exercise counseling to sedentary patients during one office visit. In the intervention condition, patients will be randomly assigned to receive reminder calls from a research assistant who will provide suggestions as to possible physical activity resources in the community that could be used.

Interventional
Phase 1
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Factorial Assignment
Masking: Single Blind
Primary Purpose: Prevention
No Specific Conditions Are Being Examined
Behavioral: Telephone counseling support
Not Provided
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
200
December 2004
Not Provided

Inclusion Criteria:

  • ambulatory adults

Exclusion Criteria:

  • cardiovascular disease
  • respiratory disease
Both
18 Years and older
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Not Provided
 
NCT00204399
HSF2001
Not Provided
Not Provided
University of Saskatchewan
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada
Principal Investigator: Kevin S Spink, Ph.D. University of Saskatchewan
University of Saskatchewan
May 2000

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP