Psychodynamic Therapy For Co-Occurring Borderline Personality Disorder and Alcohol Use Disorder

The recruitment status of this study is unknown because the information has not been verified recently.
Verified April 2008 by State University of New York - Upstate Medical University.
Recruitment status was  Active, not recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
State University of New York - Upstate Medical University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00145678
First received: September 1, 2005
Last updated: April 11, 2008
Last verified: April 2008

September 1, 2005
April 11, 2008
June 2004
May 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
episodes of parasuicide, alcohol intoxication, institutional care [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
episodes of self-injury, self-reported alcohol use, inpatient psychiatry days
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00145678 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
depression, dissociation, core symptoms of borderline pd, perceived social support [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
depression, dissociation, social and occupational functioning
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Psychodynamic Therapy For Co-Occurring Borderline Personality Disorder and Alcohol Use Disorder
Psychodynamic Therapy for Patients With Borderline Personality Disorder and Alcohol Abuse

The purpose of the study is to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of a modified form of psychodynamic psychotherapy for persons suffering from co-occurring borderline personality disorder and an alcohol use disorder.

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a condition that can cause significant distress and increased risk of death. Many persons with BPD also have an alcohol use disorder (AUD) and there is evidence that this can worsen the outcome and course of both disorders.

A manual-based form of psychodynamic therapy (PT), labeled dynamic deconstructive psychotherapy, has been developed for particularly challenging patients with BPD, especially those with co-occurring substance use disorders. It aims to remediate specific neurocognitive capacities that are responsible for processing of emotional experiences, and so diminishes symptoms of BPD and promotes the development of a coherent and differentiated self-structure. PT has been shown to be helpful for BPD, but has not been tested for people who have BPD with co-occurring substance use disorders.

The proposed study is a randomized controlled trial of PT for persons with BPD and co-occurring AUD that will generate some initial data that can be used to determine the need and feasibility for further outcome studies. Participants are randomized to either a study group receiving weekly PT or to a control group receiving usual care. Enrollment is 15 participants in each group. The study group will receive 12-18 months of PT, with naturalistic follow-up. Outcome measures are administered by a research assistant at enrollment, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, 12 months, and 30 months.

The investigators anticipate that the PT group will show trends towards better retention in treatment and greater reduction in parasuicides, alcohol misuse, and institutional care. If so, this would have important and positive implications for the large group of patients who suffer from BPD and co-occurring AUD.

Interventional
Phase 2
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • Borderline Personality Disorder
  • Alcohol Use Disorder
Behavioral: Psychodynamic Therapy
Dynamic deconstructive psychotherapy is a time-limited (12-18 month) manual-based form of psychodynamic therapy that aims to remediate specific neurocognitive capacities responsible for processing of emotional experiences.
Other Name: Dynamic Deconstructive Psychotherapy
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Active, not recruiting
30
May 2008
May 2008   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age between 18 and 45 years
  • Meets diagnostic criteria for borderline personality disorder and for active alcohol abuse or dependence
  • At least average intelligence

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Meets diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia, or schizoaffective disorder
Both
18 Years to 45 Years
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00145678
SUNY UMU IRB 4968, 130230-44
No
Robert J. Gregory, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, SUNY Upstate Medical University
State University of New York - Upstate Medical University
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Robert J. Gregory, M.D. State University of New York - Upstate Medical University
State University of New York - Upstate Medical University
April 2008

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP