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Tea's Effect on Atherosclerosis Pilot Study (TEA Study)

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by:
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00120107
First received: July 7, 2005
Last updated: November 7, 2005
Last verified: July 2005

July 7, 2005
November 7, 2005
July 2003
Not Provided
The primary outcomes will be compliance with tea intake and 2 MRI examinations.
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00120107 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Standard and novel cardiovascular risk markers, including inflammatory, prothrombotic, fibrinolytic, serum markers of endothelial function and metabolic factors. We will also assess oxidizability of LDL and VLDL cholesterol.
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Tea's Effect on Atherosclerosis Pilot Study (TEA Study)
Tea's Effect on Atherosclerosis Pilot Study (TEA Study)

The researchers propose a pilot study of the effect of long-term tea intake on atherosclerosis. Thirty patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease will be recruited and randomized to a six-month period of consumption of 3 cups per day of either tea, supplied as black tea solids readily dissolved in hot or cold liquid, or water.

At baseline and after 6 months, atherosclerosis in the aorta will be assessed using magnetic resonance imaging. The primary outcomes of this pilot study will be compliance with tea intake and 2 MRI examinations. As secondary outcomes, standard and novel cardiovascular risk markers, including inflammatory, prothrombotic, fibrinolytic, vascular and metabolic factors will be measured.

If successful, this pilot study will form the basis for a larger, long-term randomized trial to determine the effect of tea consumption on progression of atherosclerosis.

Tea is widely thought to have health benefits, particularly on cardiovascular disease (CVD). The investigator's group recently found that intake of 2 or more cups of tea per day was associated with a 44% lower long-term mortality rate than abstention from tea among 1900 patients hospitalized with myocardial infarction. Short-term trials support a benefit of tea on endothelial function, but long-term randomized trials of tea intake on CVD and atherosclerosis are needed to test the effects of tea definitively.

The researchers propose a proof-of-principle pilot study of the effect of long-term tea intake on atherosclerosis. From a large hospital-based primary care practice, 30 patients at high risk for CVD will be recruited and randomized to a six-month period of consumption of 3 cups per day of either tea, supplied as black tea solids readily dissolved in hot or cold liquid, or water. The polyphenol content of these solids will be confirmed at baseline, and a single batch of tea throughout the study will be used. At baseline and after 6 months, aortic atherosclerosis using magnetic resonance imaging, an accurate and reproducible method for measurement of arterial plaque size, will be assessed. Adherence using urinary catechins, the primary flavonoids in tea, will be measured. The primary outcomes will be compliance with tea intake and 2 MRI examinations. As secondary outcomes, standard and novel cardiovascular risk markers, including inflammatory, prothrombotic, fibrinolytic, and metabolic factors will be measured. The researchers will also assess the effects of tea consumption on oxidizability of LDL and VLDL cholesterol, using a novel affinity-column chromatography approach, and on endothelial integrity, as assessed by serum markers of endothelial function. If successful, this pilot study will form the basis for a larger, long-term randomized trial to determine the effect of tea consumption on progression of atherosclerosis.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Cardiovascular Disease
Drug: Black Tea
Not Provided
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
30
April 2005
Not Provided

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age greater than or equal to 55 years and the presence of either diabetes or two other cardiovascular risk factors. These risk factors will include hypertension, current smoking, LDL cholesterol ≥ 130 mg/dl, HDL cholesterol <40 mg/dl, or family history of premature coronary heart disease (as defined by Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines).

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients with a history of congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, arterial revascularization procedure (coronary, carotid, or peripheral), stroke, angina, or intermittent claudication will be excluded from this study. Either self-report or medical record evidence of these diagnoses will suffice for exclusion
  • Intolerance or allergy to tea consumption
  • Severe claustrophobia or intolerance to previous MRI examinations
  • Standard MRI contraindications (for example, a pacemaker, intra-auricular implants, or intracranial clips)
  • Severe illness expected to cause death or profound disability within six months
  • Uncontrolled hypertension (blood pressure greater than or equal to 180/110)
  • Chronic renal failure (serum creatinine >2.5 mg/dl or dialysis)
  • History of hyponatremia in the last year (sodium <130 mEq/dl)
  • Use of vitamin supplements greater than the recommended daily allowance
  • Inability to speak English
  • Lack of a working telephone
Both
55 Years and older
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00120107
AT001899
Not Provided
Not Provided
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)
Principal Investigator: Murray A Mittleman, MD, DrPH Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
July 2005

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP