Scleroderma Registry

This study is currently recruiting participants.
Verified April 2014 by National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00074568
First received: December 16, 2003
Last updated: April 8, 2014
Last verified: April 2014

December 16, 2003
April 8, 2014
September 2000
January 2022   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Establish National registry of Scleroderma as resource for scleroderma scientific community [ Time Frame: ongoing ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
Not Provided
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00074568 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Scleroderma Registry
Scleroderma Family Registry and DNA Repository

Scleroderma is likely caused by a combination of factors, including an external trigger (infection or other exposure) and a genetic predisposition. The Scleroderma Registry will conduct genetic analyses for disease-related genes in patients with scleroderma and their family members (parents, brothers, and sisters).

Scleroderma refers to a group of diseases that involve the abnormal growth of connective tissue, which supports the skin and internal organs. Scleroderma can affect the skin, making it hard and tight; it can also damage the blood vessels and internal organs such as the heart, lungs, and kidneys. Estimates for the number of people in the United States with the systemic (body-wide) form of scleroderma range from 40,000 to 165,000. The number of people with all scleroderma-related disorders is between 250,000 and 992,500.

Researchers believe that several factors interact to produce scleroderma, including abnormal immune activity, potential environmental triggers, and genetic makeup. Scleroderma is not passed on from parents to child, but certain genes may make a person more likely to develop the disease. The goals of this project are to identify the genes that influence disease susceptibility and expression in systemic scleroderma and to establish a repository of DNA, plasma, and serum samples from single case scleroderma families, multicase families, and healthy unrelated volunteers for the use of researchers interested in studying this disease.

Participants in the Registry will have a phone interview regarding disease characteristics and family history. Participants will be sent a blood kit to get a blood sample drawn locally for shipment to the Registry lab. Blood samples will be made available (anonymously) for studies by researchers around the country. In some cases, participants will be asked to sign a release of medical information so that medical records can be obtained to verify the diagnosis.

As of May 2009, this study is no longer enrolling family members.

Observational
Observational Model: Case Control
Time Perspective: Prospective
Not Provided
Retention:   Samples With DNA
Description:

Serum, Plasma, DNA

Non-Probability Sample

Patients diagnosed with Systemic Sclerosis or family member of patients with systemic sclerosis

or

Healthy volunteer with no autoimmune disease and without a first degree relative with a systemic autoimmune disease.

  • Systemic Sclerosis
  • Scleroderma
Not Provided
  • 1
    Patients with scleroderma and their family members (parents, brothers, and sisters)
  • 2
    Healthy volunteers with no autoimmune disease and without a first-degree relative with a systemic autoimmune disease

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
5000
Not Provided
January 2022   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria

  • Diagnosis of systemic sclerosis or family members of patients with systemic sclerosis

Or

  • Healthy volunteer with no autoimmune disease and without a first-degree relative with a systemic autoimmune disease
Both
Not Provided
Yes
Contact: Jason Anderson 713-500-7196
United States
 
NCT00074568
NIAMS-108, N01AR02251-000, NO1-AR-0-2251
No
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
Principal Investigator: Maureen D. Mayes, MD, MPH The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
April 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP