Improving Health Outcomes of Diabetic Veterans: A Diabetic Self-Management Program

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Department of Veterans Affairs
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00013052
First received: March 14, 2001
Last updated: April 25, 2014
Last verified: April 2014

March 14, 2001
April 25, 2014
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00013052 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Improving Health Outcomes of Diabetic Veterans: A Diabetic Self-Management Program
Improving Health Outcomes of Diabetic Veterans: A Diabetic Self-Management Program

Control of the blood sugar prevents complications and results in extra years of life in patients with diabetes. Practice Guidelines delineating specific ways physicians manage diabetes have been outlined. Missing are guidelines for health care providers to encourage patients to take responsibility for their diabetes. Traditional patient education models have been ineffective in managing diabetic persons because they have relied upon information given alone and are disease centered rather than patient centered. This study will explore the role of self-efficacy in helping veterans move toward healthy behaviors.

Background:

Control of the blood sugar prevents complications and results in extra years of life in patients with diabetes. Practice Guidelines delineating specific ways physicians manage diabetes have been outlined. Missing are guidelines for health care providers to encourage patients to take responsibility for their diabetes. Traditional patient education models have been ineffective in managing diabetic persons because they have relied upon information given alone and are disease centered rather than patient centered. This study will explore the role of self-efficacy in helping veterans move toward healthy behaviors.

Objectives:

The long-term objectives are to: 1) increase recognition of veteran�s responsibility for health; 2) develop more effective skills in managing chronic conditions; and 3) explore the role of self-efficacy in facilitating improvements in health behaviors and health care utilization.

Methods:

This is a prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial of 2,068 cognitively intact, diabetic veterans. The outcome measures (health behaviors, self-efficacy, health status and health care utilization) will be measured using self-rated scales developed and tested by Lorig and colleagues from Stanford University. Glucose levels and BMI changes will be evaluated using information documented in the medical record.

Status:

Enrollment (a total of 326 patients) is closed. All necessary data have been received and are being analyzed.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Factorial Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Diabetes
Behavioral: Peer led classes. Led by trained veterans with a chronic disease.
Arm 1
Intervention: Behavioral: Peer led classes. Led by trained veterans with a chronic disease.
Nodhturft V, Schneider JM, Hebert P, Bradham DD, Bryant M, Phillips M, Russo K, Goettelman D, Aldahondo A, Clark V, Wagener S. Chronic disease self-management: improving health outcomes. Nurs Clin North Am. 2000 Jun;35(2):507-18.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
2068
September 2002
Not Provided

Inclusion Criteria:

Cognitively intact diabetic veterans.

Exclusion Criteria:

Both
40 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00013052
DII 99-097
No
Department of Veterans Affairs
Department of Veterans Affairs
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Virginia Nodhturft, EdD RN James A. Haley VA Medical Center
Principal Investigator: Carolee A. DeVito, PhD MPH Department of Veterans Affairs
Department of Veterans Affairs
April 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP