Basic Mechanisms of Meditation and Cardiovascular Disease in Older Blacks

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00010530
First received: February 2, 2001
Last updated: December 4, 2009
Last verified: December 2009

February 2, 2001
December 4, 2009
September 1999
July 2006   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Not Provided
Not Provided
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00010530 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Basic Mechanisms of Meditation and Cardiovascular Disease in Older Blacks
Basic Mechanisms of Meditation and Cardiovascular Disease in Older Blacks

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of meditation on older African Americans with documented cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and disability in older African Americans, and accounts for 40% of the disproportionate risk for mortality observed in African Americans compared to white Americans. The majority of CVD patients experience acute cardiac events, many sudden and unexpected, despite conventional treatment of their disease and associated traditional risk factors. The pathophysiologic basis of these cardiac events is not fully established, but substantial evidence indicates that psychosocial stress and the sympathetic nervous system have adverse effects on both vasomotor function and long-term autonomic balance. Recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of acute cardiac events-specifically, the roles that arterial vasomotor dysfunction and sympathetic nervous system imbalance play in the pathophysiology of such acute events-provide a platform for a new mechanistic investigation of the interplay of psychosocial and environmental stress and CVD. Preliminary evidence demonstrating elevated peripheral vasoconstriction due to stress-mediated sympathetic nervous system response in African Americans further suggests that these mechanisms are particularly relevant in this group.

Interventional
Phase 1
Allocation: Randomized
Masking: Single Blind
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Cardiovascular Diseases
Procedure: Meditation
Not Provided
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
Not Provided
July 2006
July 2006   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • African-American (self-identified)
  • Local residence
  • Able to participate
  • Coronary artery disease by MI, CABG, PTCA (>3 months prior), or angiography
  • Consent and referring MD approval
Both
65 Years and older
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
NCT00010530
P50 AT000082-01P1, P50AT000082-01, P50AT000082-02
Yes
Not Provided
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Robert H. Schneider, MD Center for Health and Aging Studies
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)
December 2009

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP