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Pooled Analysis of NHANES I/II--Race, Gender, and CHD

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00005492
First received: May 25, 2000
Last updated: June 23, 2005
Last verified: March 2005

May 25, 2000
June 23, 2005
August 1997
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00005492 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Pooled Analysis of NHANES I/II--Race, Gender, and CHD
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To conduct a pooled analysis of NHANES I/II data on race, gender, and coronary heart disease.

BACKGROUND:

Over the last 25 years, a sustained and marked decline in death rates from coronary heart disease (CHD) has occurred for all major segments of the U.S. population. Recently, however, the decline has proceeded less rapidly in blacks than in whites, and in women than men. These trends have focused further attention on possible heterogeneity in the risk factor patterns among the demographic sub-groups. Previous studies of CHD risk factors in blacks and whites using the First National Health and Examination Survey Epidemiologic Follow-up Study (NHEFS-I, 11-year follow-up), including this group's own work, demonstrate its potential strengths, while at the same time foundering on the problem of low statistical power. With the extension of the follow-up of NHANES-I cohort (1971-1974) to 1987 (14 years) and the completion of 14-year follow-up for NHANES II cohort (1976-1980), a strong rationale exists to undertake a "pooling project." The resulting data set would provide optimal characterization of CHD risk at the national level.

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

The study sought to determine whether data from NHANES I and NHANES II could be pooled. To accomplish this, the distribution of baseline measures was assessed and a determination was made whether the same logistic prediction equations fitted both studies. Also, gender-race differences were examined in individual exposure-outcome relationships, patterns of co-morbidity, and population attributable risks. .

Observational
Observational Model: Natural History
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  • Cardiovascular Diseases
  • Coronary Disease
  • Heart Diseases
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Liao Y, McGee DL, Cooper RS, Sutkowski MB. How generalizable are coronary risk prediction models? Comparison of Framingham and two national cohorts. Am Heart J. 1999 May;137(5):837-45.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
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July 2000
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No eligibility criteria

Male
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No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
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NCT00005492
5009
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National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
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Investigator: Youlian Liao Loyola University
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
March 2005

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP