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Incidence and Outcomes of Venous Thromboembolism

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00005351
First received: May 25, 2000
Last updated: June 23, 2005
Last verified: September 2002

May 25, 2000
June 23, 2005
August 1991
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00005351 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Incidence and Outcomes of Venous Thromboembolism
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To identify the incidence cohort of Olmsted County Minnesota residents with deep venous thrombosis (DVT)/pulmonary embolism (PE) from 1966 through 1990. Episodes of DVT or PE acquired during hospitalization or in the community were identified for future studies.

BACKGROUND:

Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism most often occur during hospitalization for surgery or chronic medical conditions. Consequently information on deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism is derived from large referral hospitals, and there are substantial gaps in our understanding of the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism in the community. This was one of the first studies to compare hospital acquired deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism with deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism among ambulatory residents in a community.

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

The five part study: 1. identified the incidence cohort and tested the hypotheses that over the 25 year study period the incidence of deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism had decreased, the extent of testing for suspected deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism had increased, and the number of tests obtained for patients with deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism had increased. 2. determined the independent risk factors for deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism and estimated the population attribute risk due to each independent risk factor for deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism in a case-control study of the incidence cohort and community controls. 3. tested the hypothesis that deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism were independent risk factors for death after adjusting for age, sex and co-morbid conditions. 4. described the occurrence of the post-phlebitic syndrome, pulmonary hypertension, and recurrent deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism over the 25 year study period and identified the independent risk factors for lower extremity venous ulceration. 5. evaluated the accuracy of national pulmonary embolism mortality rates by comparing pulmonary embolism mortality rates calculated from a review of all the inpatient and outpatient medical records of Olmsted County deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism patients with death certificate pulmonary embolism mortality rates for Olmsted County from the National Center for Health Statistics. The study provided the most complete and comprehensive population based estimates of the incidence, risk factors, survival and outcomes of deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolism available to date.

Observational
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  • Cardiovascular Diseases
  • Lung Diseases
  • Pulmonary Embolism
  • Venous Thromboembolism
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
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July 1994
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No eligibility criteria

Male
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No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
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NCT00005351
4226
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National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
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National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
September 2002

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP