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Inflammation, Autonomic Dysfunction and Airway Disease

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00005298
First received: May 25, 2000
Last updated: June 23, 2005
Last verified: June 2000

May 25, 2000
June 23, 2005
July 1990
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00005298 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Inflammation, Autonomic Dysfunction and Airway Disease
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To determine whether airway inflammation secondary to inhalation of specific allergens and other environmental agents and functional imbalance of the autonomic nervous system played important roles in asthma and chronic bronchitis.

BACKGROUND:

Asthma and chronic bronchitis are among the most common chronic diseases afflicting middle-aged and elderly adults in the United States, respectively occurring in 4 percent and 5 percent of the population in these age groups. While chronic bronchitis is often caused by cigarette smoking and asthma often occurs in nonsmokers in association with atopy, the two conditions may be difficult to differentiate in many middle-aged and older adults and may share a number of pathophysiologic features including increased airway smooth muscle tone, increased airway responsiveness to bronchoconstricting stimuli, and bronchial mucus hypersecretion. The precise mechanisms which produce the alterations of airway function are not clear. Such functional alterations may be caused by airway inflammation and abnormalities of the autonomic nervous system; however, there are little population data available regarding the importance of airway inflammation and disordered neural regulation in the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness and mucus hypersecretion. Also, little is known about potential interactions between airway inflammation and disordered neural regulation of airway function in the pathogenesis of chronic airways disease. Information on the relationships may offer insights into the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying asthma and chronic bronchitis in adults.

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

The study was cross-sectional and used a subgroup of the Normative Aging Study, a longitudinal study of aging in men established by the Veterans Administration in 1963. The study used data normally collected during NAS examinations and included smoking history, socio-economic status, anthropometry, respiratory symptoms and illnesses, and pulmonary function. New data were collected on: indices of inflammation as indicated by histamine, leukotriene, and serotonin in urine; autonomic activity as indicated by urinary catecholamine excretion and heart rate variation induced by deep breathing; autonomic responsiveness as measured by pupillary alpha-adrenergic and cholinergic responses.

Observational
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  • Lung Diseases
  • Asthma
  • Bronchitis
  • Inflammation
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
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June 1993
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No eligibility criteria

Male
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No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
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NCT00005298
2021
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National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
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National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
June 2000

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP