Trial record 2 of 1134 for:    nichd National Children's Study

Expansion of Childhood Relationship Study to Young Adult Romantic Relationships

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified December 2013 by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC) ( Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) )
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01866852
First received: May 29, 2013
Last updated: March 14, 2014
Last verified: December 2013
  Purpose

Background:

- An earlier study on child development focused on the relationship between children and their caregivers (usually mothers). It looked at how this relationship influenced children's social and mental development. It also studied how these children related with family members and friends. Researchers are now interested in expanding the study with the same group of children. They want to look at these children, who are now young adults, and focus on their current romantic relationships. This new study will look at how child development affects the formation of stable, mature romantic relationships in young adulthood. Original child study participants and their significant others will be included in the new study. Only participants who are living together with a partner will be studied.

Objectives:

- To look at romantic partnerships in a childhood study s original participants and their significant others.

Eligibility:

  • Participants of the 88-CH-32 study who are at least 18 years of age.
  • Significant others of the study participants who are at least 18 years of age.
  • Original participants and significant others must be cohabiting (living together).

Design:

  • No screening tests will be required for this study. No study visits will be needed. Samples will not be collected.
  • Original study participants will fill out four online questionnaires. They will be on a National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHHD) website. They will ask personal questions about relationships with the current romantic partner and other important people. The questions will take about 25 minutes to answer.
  • Significant others will fill out 13 online questionnaires. They will be on a NICHHD website. They will ask personal questions about the romantic partner and other important people. The questions will take about 1.5 hours to answer.
  • All participants will receive a small amount of money for completing the study.

Condition
Healthy

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: The Formation of Healthy, Stable Romantic Relationships During Young Adulthood: A Developmental and Dyadic Perspective

Further study details as provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • The formation of healthy marriages [ Time Frame: A single assessment within the first 60 days of enrollment ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

Estimated Enrollment: 500
Study Start Date: April 2013
Estimated Study Completion Date: December 2022
Estimated Primary Completion Date: June 2020 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Detailed Description:

The purpose of this study is to expand our ongoing longitudinal study (study 88-CH-32) by gathering information about romantic partnerships from both the longitudinal study s now young adult target children, who were 5 months old when the study began and are now as old as 23 years of age, and their significant others. Because the target children are approaching the age when they form lasting romantic relationships, we wish to track these partnerships as they form. With these data, we will be uniquely suited to identify how key individual and inter-personal factors at distinct points of development (i.e., childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood) influence the formation of stable, emotionally intimate, mutually dependent romantic relationships during young adulthood. In particular, we aim to disentangle the influence of childhood and adolescent interpersonal experiences in other relational spheres (i.e., relationships with parents and friends) from the influence of contemporary characteristics of both members of the romantic dyad. As part of our examination, in addition to relationship quality, we focus on the strength of each dyad member s attachment to his or her parents as well as each other, thereby allowing for the examination of attachment transfer, an important yet understudied characteristic of successful romantic relationship formation.

Only cohabiting (whether married or otherwise) young-adult romantic dyads that include a target child from our existing longitudinal study (dyad N equals 250; 500 young adults overall, all volunteers) will be eligible to participate in this new data collection. By limiting eligibility in this way, we will have data extending back to infancy for one member of each young-adult romantic dyad. All data collected will be collected via a secure, password-protected website.

As part of our on-going longitudinal study, we already collected (or will collect) individual information from the young adult target children (mental health, attachment style, attachment strength, personality, substance use). We propose here to collect complementary individual information from the significant others of young adult target children as well as dyad-level information (relationship satisfaction and household functioning) from both members of the cohabiting romantic dyad. Combined with existing data from our longitudinal study, these new data will enable us to move beyond most current research focused on the developmental antecedents of successful young adult romantic relationships and examine how an individual s past interpersonal experiences interplay with the contemporary characteristics of both young-adult romantic dyad members to influence the state of the romantic dyad.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 30 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria
  • INCLUSION AND EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

Among the young adult target children from study 88-CH-32 (N = 250), those with significant others are eligible to participate in this study, as are their significant others. However if a target child s significant other is a minor (i.e., under the age of 18), that significant other will not be eligible to participate.

  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01866852

Contacts
Contact: Charlene Hendricks, Ph.D. (301) 496-6832 hendricc@mail.nih.gov
Contact: Marc H Bornstein, Ph.D. (301) 496-6832 bornstem@cfr.nichd.nih.gov

Locations
United States, Maryland
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), 9000 Rockville Recruiting
Bethesda, Maryland, United States, 20892
Sponsors and Collaborators
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Marc H Bornstein, Ph.D. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
  More Information

Publications:
Responsible Party: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC) ( Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) )
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01866852     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 999913113, 13-CH-N113
Study First Received: May 29, 2013
Last Updated: March 14, 2014
Health Authority: United States: Federal Government

Keywords provided by National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC):
Parental Attachment and Transfer
Social Learning Theory
Developmental Transitions
Healthy Romantic Relationship
Young Adulthood

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 28, 2014