Impact Evaluation of a Family-based Intervention With Burmese Migrant and Displaced Children and Families in Tak Province, Thailand

This study is ongoing, but not recruiting participants.
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
Harvard School of Public Health
Duke University
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
International Rescue Committee
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01668992
First received: August 16, 2012
Last updated: NA
Last verified: August 2012
History: No changes posted
  Purpose

The study will evaluate the impact of a family-based intervention on the well-being of Burmese migrant and displaced children and families living in Tak province, Thailand. The methodology used in the impact evaluation study is a randomized waitlist controlled trial.

The study hypothesizes that participation in a family-based intervention will lead to improved parenting practices and child and family outcomes, as follows.

Primary hypotheses:

  1. Parents/caregivers participating in the family-based intervention will report increased knowledge and use of positive parenting skills compared to control;
  2. Parents/caregivers participating in the family-based intervention will report less use of physical punishment and other harsh forms of discipline compared to control;
  3. Parents/caregivers and children participating in the family-based intervention will report higher levels of family functioning and cohesion compared to control.

Secondary hypotheses:

  1. Parents/caregivers and children participating in the family-based intervention will report lower levels of externalizing and internalizing child behaviors compared to control;
  2. Parents/caregivers and children participating in the family-based intervention will report higher levels of child resilience and psychosocial well-being compared to control;
  3. Parents/caregivers participating in the family-based intervention will report lower levels of alcohol use compared to control.

Condition Intervention
Parenting Practices
Family Functioning
Child Psychosocial Well-being
Alcohol Use
Behavioral: Family intervention

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Subject)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Impact Evaluation of a Family-based Intervention With Burmese Migrant and Displaced Children and Families in Tak Province, Thailand

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by International Rescue Committee:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Parenting practices [ Time Frame: One month and six months post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Changes in knowledge and use of positive parenting skills; change in use of physical punishment and other harsh forms of discipline.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Child psychosocial well-being [ Time Frame: One month and six months post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Changes in report of child externalizing and internalizing symptoms and resilience.


Other Outcome Measures:
  • Family functioning and cohesion [ Time Frame: One month and six months post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Changes in levels of family communication, decision-making and relationships.

  • Alcohol use [ Time Frame: One month and six months post-intervention ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Changes in adult alcohol use.


Estimated Enrollment: 1000
Study Start Date: September 2011
Estimated Study Completion Date: August 2013
Estimated Primary Completion Date: May 2013 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Family intervention
Families receive 12-week program on parenting skills, discipline methods and family communication.
Behavioral: Family intervention
12-week parenting skills program for Burmese migrant and displaced children and families.
Other Name: Happy Families Program
No Intervention: Waitlist control
Families are on a waitlist and receive the intervention only after the trial is complete.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   8 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Of Burmese origin
  • Currently living in one of 20 target communities in Tak province, Thailand
  • Primary caregiver to at least one child aged 8 to 12 years
  • Child aged 8 to 12 years
  • Participating in the family intervention

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Children living in orphanages, boarding houses, factories or other institutions
  • Persons with severe cognitive or physical disability who are impaired and unable to understand and give informed consent
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01668992

Locations
Thailand
International Rescue Committee (IRC) Thailand
Mae Sot, Tak, Thailand, 63110
Sponsors and Collaborators
International Rescue Committee
United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
Harvard School of Public Health
Duke University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Theresa S Betancourt, Sc.D., M.A. Harvard School of Public Health
Principal Investigator: Jeannie Annan, PhD International Rescue Committee
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: International Rescue Committee
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01668992     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 21050
Study First Received: August 16, 2012
Last Updated: August 16, 2012
Health Authority: Thailand: Ministry of Public Health

Keywords provided by International Rescue Committee:
Parenting
Discipline
Family interventions
Thailand
Migration

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Alcohol Drinking
Drinking Behavior

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on July 24, 2014