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An Interactive Game for HIV Prevention in Early Adolescents

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified July 2014 by Yale University
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Lynn E. Fiellin, Yale University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01666496
First received: August 9, 2012
Last updated: July 8, 2014
Last verified: July 2014
  Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate, through a randomized clinical trial, the efficacy of an interactive video game the investigators are developing at reducing risk behaviors in at-risk teens. The investigators are using proven components of HIV prevention interventions, social cognitive theory, self-efficacy, prospect theory, message framing, and video gaming principles to develop and evaluate this interactive HIV prevention video game. In Phase 1 of this project, the investigators have been working with Schell Games of Pittsburgh, PA, Digitalmill of Portland, ME, and the Farnam Neighborhood House in New Haven, CT to develop our interactive video game with the input from our experts and focus groups and interviews with adolescents. Phase 1 has been a developmental iterative process in which the investigators have been building the software for the game for the purposes of targeting HIV prevention in our population of interest: young minority adolescents. Following development of the video game, the investigators will move to Phase 2 in which the investigators will enroll 330 minority adolescents who are attendees at one of several after-school programs in the greater New Haven area and assign them to play either the experimental game or a control game. In the experimental game, the player will be presented with a series of "risk challenges" thereby helping them to develop sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills.


Condition Intervention
HIV
Risk Reduction
Behavioral: Experimental Video Game
Behavioral: Off the Shelf Video Game

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: An Interactive Video Game for HIV Prevention in Early Adolescents

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Yale University:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Delay in the initiation of sexual activity [ Time Frame: 3 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The primary outcome measure will be delay in initiating sexual activity. Delay in initiation of sexual activity will be defined as individuals who report having never had voluntary sexual intercourse prior to the baseline assessment and continue to not initiate sexual activity. Those who report initiating sex between baseline and the follow-up period are defined as having initiated sexual activity.

  • Delay in the initiation of sexual activity [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The primary outcome measure will be delay in initiating sexual activity. Delay in initiation of sexual activity will be defined as individuals who report having never had voluntary sexual intercourse prior to the baseline assessment and continue to not initiate sexual activity. Those who report initiating sex between baseline and the follow-up period are defined as having initiated sexual activity.

  • Delay in the initiation of sexual activity [ Time Frame: 3 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The primary outcome measure will be delay in initiating sexual activity. Delay in initiation of sexual activity will be defined as individuals who report having never had voluntary sexual intercourse prior to the baseline assessment and continue to not initiate sexual activity. Those who report initiating sex between baseline and the follow-up period are defined as having initiated sexual activity.

  • Delay in the initiation of sexual activity [ Time Frame: 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The primary outcome measure will be delay in initiating sexual activity. Delay in initiation of sexual activity will be defined as individuals who report having never had voluntary sexual intercourse prior to the baseline assessment and continue to not initiate sexual activity. Those who report initiating sex between baseline and the follow-up period are defined as having initiated sexual activity.

  • Delay in the initiation of sexual activity [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The primary outcome measure will be delay in initiating sexual activity. Delay in initiation of sexual activity will be defined as individuals who report having never had voluntary sexual intercourse prior to the baseline assessment and continue to not initiate sexual activity. Those who report initiating sex between baseline and the follow-up period are defined as having initiated sexual activity.

  • Delay in the initiation of sexual activity [ Time Frame: 24 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The primary outcome measure will be delay in initiating sexual activity. Delay in initiation of sexual activity will be defined as individuals who report having never had voluntary sexual intercourse prior to the baseline assessment and continue to not initiate sexual activity. Those who report initiating sex between baseline and the follow-up period are defined as having initiated sexual activity.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Knowledge about HIV/AIDS risk behaviors and transmission [ Time Frame: 3 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases HIV risk knowledge in minority early adolescents.

  • Level of social competency in using negotiating and refusal skills in the virtual environment [ Time Frame: 3 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases social competency in using negotiating and refusal skills in the virtual environment in minority early adolescents. Social competency is defined as skills that allow the individual to achieve personal goals in social interaction while maintaining positive relationships with others over time and across situations. This will be captured through data collected during the game play, including the participant's ability to negotiate social situations and successfully refuse risky situations.

  • Level of self-efficacy regarding negotiation around initiation of sexual activity [ Time Frame: 3 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases self-efficacy regarding negotiation around initiation of sexual activity in minority adolescents.We will use 7 items to assess self-efficacy to refuse sexual behaviors. Participants will be presented with the situation "imagine you are alone with someone you like very much" and then asked to indicate how confident they are that they could stop the person if he or she wanted to (a) kiss them on the lips, (b) touch their chest or breasts, (c) touch their private parts below the waist, (d) have oral sex, or (e) have vaginal sex. Participants will report how confident they are that they could refuse sex if they had been drinking or had strong sexual feelings for someone. Self-efficacy for condom use will be measured using 5 items (e.g., "If you wanted to get a condom, how sure are you that you could go to the store and buy one?").

  • Drug and alcohol use behaviors [ Time Frame: 3 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, decreases drug and alcohol use behaviors in minority early adolescents.

  • Level of self-efficacy in negotiating situations involving offers of drugs and alcohol [ Time Frame: 3 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases self-efficacy in negotiating situations involving offers of drugs and alcohol in minority adolescents.To assess participants' self-efficacy to refuse drugs we will use 6 items adapted from the Drug Use Resistance Self-Efficacy (DURSE) Scale for Young Adolescents (Carpenter & Howard, 2009). We will administer 2 items each for cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana assessing participants' confidence to refuse the drug if it is offered by (a) a friend or (b) an older friend of family member.

  • Overall risk-taking behaviors [ Time Frame: 3 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game,reduces overall risk-taking behaviors in minority early adolescents.

  • Knowledge about HIV/AIDS risk behaviors and transmission [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases HIV risk knowledge in minority early adolescents.

  • Knowledge about HIV/AIDS risk behaviors and transmission [ Time Frame: 3 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases HIV risk knowledge in minority early adolescents.

  • Knowledge about HIV/AIDS risk behaviors and transmission [ Time Frame: 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases HIV risk knowledge in minority early adolescents.

  • Knowledge about HIV/AIDS risk behaviors and transmission [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases HIV risk knowledge in minority early adolescents.

  • Knowledge about HIV/AIDS risk behaviors and transmission [ Time Frame: 24 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases HIV risk knowledge in minority early adolescents.

  • Level of social competency in using negotiating and refusal skills in the virtual environment [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases social competency in using negotiating and refusal skills in the virtual environment in minority early adolescents.Social competency is defined as skills that allow the individual to achieve personal goals in social interaction while maintaining positive relationships with others over time and across situations. This will be captured through data collected during the game play, including the participant's ability to negotiate social situations and successfully refuse risky situations.

  • Level of social competency in using negotiating and refusal skills in the virtual environment [ Time Frame: 3 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases social competency in using negotiating and refusal skills in the virtual environment in minority early adolescents.Social competency is defined as skills that allow the individual to achieve personal goals in social interaction while maintaining positive relationships with others over time and across situations. This will be captured through data collected during the game play, including the participant's ability to negotiate social situations and successfully refuse risky situations.

  • Level of social competency in using negotiating and refusal skills in the virtual environment [ Time Frame: 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases social competency in using negotiating and refusal skills in the virtual environment in minority early adolescents.Social competency is defined as skills that allow the individual to achieve personal goals in social interaction while maintaining positive relationships with others over time and across situations. This will be captured through data collected during the game play, including the participant's ability to negotiate social situations and successfully refuse risky situations.

  • Level of social competency in using negotiating and refusal skills in the virtual environment [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases social competency in using negotiating and refusal skills in the virtual environment in minority early adolescents. Social competency is defined as skills that allow the individual to achieve personal goals in social interaction while maintaining positive relationships with others over time and across situations. This will be captured through data collected during the game play, including the participant's ability to negotiate social situations and successfully refuse risky situations.

  • Level of social competency in using negotiating and refusal skills in the virtual environment [ Time Frame: 24 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases social competency in using negotiating and refusal skills in the virtual environment in minority early adolescents.Social competency is defined as skills that allow the individual to achieve personal goals in social interaction while maintaining positive relationships with others over time and across situations. This will be captured through data collected during the game play, including the participant's ability to negotiate social situations and successfully refuse risky situations.

  • Level of self-efficacy regarding negotiation around initiation of sexual activity [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases self-efficacy regarding negotiation around initiation of sexual activity in minority adolescents.We will use 7 items to assess self-efficacy to refuse sexual behaviors. Participants will be presented with the situation "imagine you are alone with someone you like very much" and then asked to indicate how confident they are that they could stop the person if he or she wanted to (a) kiss them on the lips, (b) touch their chest or breasts, (c) touch their private parts below the waist, (d) have oral sex, or (e) have vaginal sex. Participants will report how confident they are that they could refuse sex if they had been drinking or had strong sexual feelings for someone. Self-efficacy for condom use will be measured using 5 items (e.g., "If you wanted to get a condom, how sure are you that you could go to the store and buy one?").

  • Level of self-efficacy regarding negotiation around initiation of sexual activity [ Time Frame: 3 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases self-efficacy regarding negotiation around initiation of sexual activity in minority adolescents.We will use 7 items to assess self-efficacy to refuse sexual behaviors. Participants will be presented with the situation "imagine you are alone with someone you like very much" and then asked to indicate how confident they are that they could stop the person if he or she wanted to (a) kiss them on the lips, (b) touch their chest or breasts, (c) touch their private parts below the waist, (d) have oral sex, or (e) have vaginal sex. Participants will report how confident they are that they could refuse sex if they had been drinking or had strong sexual feelings for someone. Self-efficacy for condom use will be measured using 5 items (e.g., "If you wanted to get a condom, how sure are you that you could go to the store and buy one?").

  • Level of self-efficacy regarding negotiation around initiation of sexual activity [ Time Frame: 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases self-efficacy regarding negotiation around initiation of sexual activity in minority adolescents.We will use 7 items to assess self-efficacy to refuse sexual behaviors. Participants will be presented with the situation "imagine you are alone with someone you like very much" and then asked to indicate how confident they are that they could stop the person if he or she wanted to (a) kiss them on the lips, (b) touch their chest or breasts, (c) touch their private parts below the waist, (d) have oral sex, or (e) have vaginal sex. Participants will report how confident they are that they could refuse sex if they had been drinking or had strong sexual feelings for someone. Self-efficacy for condom use will be measured using 5 items (e.g., "If you wanted to get a condom, how sure are you that you could go to the store and buy one?").

  • Level of self-efficacy regarding negotiation around initiation of sexual activity [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases self-efficacy regarding negotiation around initiation of sexual activity in minority adolescents.We will use 7 items to assess self-efficacy to refuse sexual behaviors. Participants will be presented with the situation "imagine you are alone with someone you like very much" and then asked to indicate how confident they are that they could stop the person if he or she wanted to (a) kiss them on the lips, (b) touch their chest or breasts, (c) touch their private parts below the waist, (d) have oral sex, or (e) have vaginal sex. Participants will report how confident they are that they could refuse sex if they had been drinking or had strong sexual feelings for someone. Self-efficacy for condom use will be measured using 5 items (e.g., "If you wanted to get a condom, how sure are you that you could go to the store and buy one?").

  • Level of self-efficacy regarding negotiation around initiation of sexual activity [ Time Frame: 24 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases self-efficacy regarding negotiation around initiation of sexual activity in minority adolescents.We will use 7 items to assess self-efficacy to refuse sexual behaviors. Participants will be presented with the situation "imagine you are alone with someone you like very much" and then asked to indicate how confident they are that they could stop the person if he or she wanted to (a) kiss them on the lips, (b) touch their chest or breasts, (c) touch their private parts below the waist, (d) have oral sex, or (e) have vaginal sex. Participants will report how confident they are that they could refuse sex if they had been drinking or had strong sexual feelings for someone. Self-efficacy for condom use will be measured using 5 items (e.g., "If you wanted to get a condom, how sure are you that you could go to the store and buy one?").

  • Drug and alcohol use behaviors [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, decreases drug and alcohol use behaviors in minority early adolescents.

  • Drug and alcohol use behaviors [ Time Frame: 3 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, decreases drug and alcohol use behaviors in minority early adolescents.

  • Drug and alcohol use behaviors [ Time Frame: 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, decreases drug and alcohol use behaviors in minority early adolescents.

  • Drug and alcohol use behaviors [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, decreases drug and alcohol use behaviors in minority early adolescents.

  • Drug and alcohol use behaviors [ Time Frame: 24 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, decreases drug and alcohol use behaviors in minority early adolescents.

  • Level of self-efficacy in negotiating situations involving offers of drugs and alcohol [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases self-efficacy in negotiating situations involving offers of drugs and alcohol in minority adolescents.To assess participants' self-efficacy to refuse drugs we will use 6 items adapted from the Drug Use Resistance Self-Efficacy (DURSE) Scale for Young Adolescents (Carpenter & Howard, 2009). We will administer 2 items each for cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana assessing participants' confidence to refuse the drug if it is offered by (a) a friend or (b) an older friend of family member.

  • Level of self-efficacy in negotiating situations involving offers of drugs and alcohol [ Time Frame: 3 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases self-efficacy in negotiating situations involving offers of drugs and alcohol in minority adolescents.To assess participants' self-efficacy to refuse drugs we will use 6 items adapted from the Drug Use Resistance Self-Efficacy (DURSE) Scale for Young Adolescents (Carpenter & Howard, 2009). We will administer 2 items each for cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana assessing participants' confidence to refuse the drug if it is offered by (a) a friend or (b) an older friend of family member.

  • Level of self-efficacy in negotiating situations involving offers of drugs and alcohol [ Time Frame: 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases self-efficacy in negotiating situations involving offers of drugs and alcohol in minority adolescents.To assess participants' self-efficacy to refuse drugs we will use 6 items adapted from the Drug Use Resistance Self-Efficacy (DURSE) Scale for Young Adolescents (Carpenter & Howard, 2009). We will administer 2 items each for cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana assessing participants' confidence to refuse the drug if it is offered by (a) a friend or (b) an older friend of family member.

  • Level of self-efficacy in negotiating situations involving offers of drugs and alcohol [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases self-efficacy in negotiating situations involving offers of drugs and alcohol in minority adolescents.To assess participants' self-efficacy to refuse drugs we will use 6 items adapted from the Drug Use Resistance Self-Efficacy (DURSE) Scale for Young Adolescents (Carpenter & Howard, 2009). We will administer 2 items each for cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana assessing participants' confidence to refuse the drug if it is offered by (a) a friend or (b) an older friend of family member.

  • Level of self-efficacy in negotiating situations involving offers of drugs and alcohol [ Time Frame: 24 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game, increases self-efficacy in negotiating situations involving offers of drugs and alcohol in minority adolescents.To assess participants' self-efficacy to refuse drugs we will use 6 items adapted from the Drug Use Resistance Self-Efficacy (DURSE) Scale for Young Adolescents (Carpenter & Howard, 2009). We will administer 2 items each for cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana assessing participants' confidence to refuse the drug if it is offered by (a) a friend or (b) an older friend of family member.

  • Overall risk-taking behaviors [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game,reduces overall risk-taking behaviors in minority early adolescents.

  • Overall risk-taking behaviors [ Time Frame: 3 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game,reduces overall risk-taking behaviors in minority early adolescents.

  • Overall risk-taking behaviors [ Time Frame: 6 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game,reduces overall risk-taking behaviors in minority early adolescents.

  • Overall risk-taking behaviors [ Time Frame: 12 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game,reduces overall risk-taking behaviors in minority early adolescents.

  • Overall risk-taking behaviors [ Time Frame: 24 months ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    To determine if an interactive videogame focused on developing sex, drug and alcohol negotiation and refusal skills, compared to a control game,reduces overall risk-taking behaviors in minority early adolescents.


Estimated Enrollment: 330
Study Start Date: January 2013
Estimated Study Completion Date: July 2015
Estimated Primary Completion Date: July 2015 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Experimental Video Game
Participants will play the experimental videogame for 6 weeks. The intervention will be provided during 12 sessions, twice weekly for 6 weeks; each session will involve one and one-quarter hour of game play.
Behavioral: Experimental Video Game
Participants will play either the experimental or the control videogame for 6 weeks. Both interventions will be provided during 12 sessions, twice weekly for 6 weeks; each session will involve one and one-quarter hour of game play.
Off the Shelf Video Game
Participants will play the off the shelf videogame for 6 weeks. The intervention be provided during 12 sessions, twice weekly for 6 weeks; each session will involve one and one-quarter hour of game play.
Behavioral: Off the Shelf Video Game
Participants will play either the experimental or the control videogame for 6 weeks. Both interventions will be provided during 12 sessions, twice weekly for 6 weeks; each session will involve one and one-quarter hour of game play.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   11 Years to 14 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion/Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Ages 11-14 years
  2. Able to provide assent/parental/guardian consent
  3. Agree to participate in a computer-based videogame (willing to sit at a computer for 75 minutes twice weekly to play the game)
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01666496

Contacts
Contact: Lynn E Fiellin, MD lynn.fiellin@yale.edu
Contact: Kimberly D Hieftje, PhD 2037375595 kimberly.hieftje@yale.edu

Locations
United States, Connecticut
Yale School of Medicine Recruiting
New Haven, Connecticut, United States, 06510
Contact: Lynn Fiellin, MD    203-737-3347    lynn.fiellin@yale.edu   
Contact: Kimberly Hieftje, PhD    203-737-5595    kimberly.hieftje@yale.edu   
Principal Investigator: Lynn E Fiellin, MD         
Sponsors and Collaborators
Yale University
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Lynn E Fiellin, MD Yale School of Medicine
  More Information

Additional Information:
No publications provided

Responsible Party: Lynn E. Fiellin, Associate Professor, Yale University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01666496     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 1208010715
Study First Received: August 9, 2012
Last Updated: July 8, 2014
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by Yale University:
Adolescent
risk
HIV
video games

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on November 27, 2014