Enhancing Children's Cognitive and Brain Health Through Physical Activity Training (FITKids2)

This study is currently recruiting participants. (see Contacts and Locations)
Verified August 2014 by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01619826
First received: June 12, 2012
Last updated: August 25, 2014
Last verified: August 2014
  Purpose

The objective of this study is to use a randomized controlled design to determine whether cardiorespiratory fitness training improves neurocognitive function and academic performance during preadolescent development.


Condition Intervention Phase
Cognitive Ability, General
Achievement
Behavioral: Physical Activity
Phase 3

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: Enhancing Children's Cognitive and Brain Health Through Physical Activity Training

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • NeuroCognitive Assessment [ Time Frame: Change from baseline, 36 - 40 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Normed computerized test battery for cognitive testing

  • Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging [ Time Frame: Change from baseline, 36 - 40 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
    Measures of brain structure

  • Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging [ Time Frame: Change from baseline, 36 - 40 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: Yes ]
    Measures of brain function

  • Academic Achievement [ Time Frame: Change from baseline, 36 - 40 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Scholastic achievement tests of reading comprehension and arithmetic

  • Eye Tracking [ Time Frame: Change from baseline, 36 - 40 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measures of visual gaze

  • Task Performance [ Time Frame: Change from baseline, 36 - 40 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measures of responses speed and accuracy


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Event-related Brain Potentials [ Time Frame: Change from baseline, 36 - 40 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measures of the neuroelectric system that occur in response to, or in preparation for, a discrete event

  • DXA Body Mass Assessment [ Time Frame: Change from baseline, 36 - 40 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measures of bone density, total body composition, and fat content

  • Diet and Brain Function [ Time Frame: Change from baseline, 36-40 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measure of correlation between diet and brain function

  • Adiposity [ Time Frame: Change from baseline, 36 - 40 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    Measure of change in adiposity


Estimated Enrollment: 240
Study Start Date: April 2012
Estimated Study Completion Date: April 2017
Estimated Primary Completion Date: April 2017 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Treatment Group
Participants randomized to the physical activity-based afterschool intervention
Behavioral: Physical Activity
9-month afterschool program designed to increase physical activity and aerobic fitness.
Placebo Comparator: Wait List Group
Participants in this group partake in their regular afterschool activities, without intervention from the study staff.
Behavioral: Physical Activity
Participants in this group partake in their regular afterschool activities, without intervention from the study staff.

Detailed Description:

The long term objective of this project is to develop an understanding of lifestyle factors that influence the cognitive and brain health of children while also reducing the sedentary nature of today's youth. Previous research has found that physical activity interventions can enhance both a variety of aspects of cognition and brain structure and function of children, older adults, and individuals with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis. More specifically, in previous research with children the researchers have found that higher fit children possess larger hippocampi which in turn are related to better relational memory than their lower fit counterparts. The researchers have also observed that higher fit children exhibit more efficient executive control as indicated by performance measures and event-related brain potentials. While intriguing, these cross-sectional data do not enable us to establish causality between physical activity and cognition. In the current study the researchers substantially extend this previous research by examining the influence of a 9 month randomized controlled afterschool physical activity program on cognition and brain health. Cognition will be assessed with a battery of tasks and standardized achievement tests both before and after the 9 month intervention in the activity group and a wait list control (who will receive the intervention the following year). Children will also participate in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sessions both before and after the intervention (and at comparable times for the wait list control). In these sessions the researchers will measure both structural aspects of the brain including regional volumes of gray matter and the integrity of the white matter tracts (through diffusion tensor imaging) and functional aspects of brain function using fMRI activity recorded as the children perform a series of executive control and memory tasks. The researchers anticipate, based on our cross-sectional studies with children and our previous longitudinal studies with older adults, that the children in the physical activity program will show both larger regional brain volumes, particularly in brain regions that subserve executive control and relational memory, and more efficient brain function, as indexed by task-related and resting state fMRI. Furthermore, the researchers anticipate that these changes will be accompanied by improvements in memory and executive control processes. Given recent trends identifying decreased levels of physical activity and health status in preadolescents, the understanding of the potential benefits of physical activity on cognition is of great interest. It is imperative that factors positively influencing cognitive function of children be examined to maximize health and effective functioning of individuals as they progress through the lifespan.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   8 Years to 9 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Parental/guardian consent
  • 8 - 9 years old
  • Capable of performing exercise
  • Absence of school-identified learning disability
  • IQ >= 85
  • Tanner Scales score <= 2
  • ADHD Rating Scales score >= 85%
  • Right hand dominant
  • Absence of metal implants
  • Not claustrophobic

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Non-consent of guardian
  • Above or below 8 - 9 years old
  • Any physical disability that prohibits exercise
  • School-identified learning disability
  • IQ < 85
  • Tanner Scales score > 2
  • ADHD Rating Scale score < 85%
  • Left hand dominant
  • Presence of metal implants
  • Claustrophobic
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01619826

Contacts
Contact: Jeanine Bensken, B.S. 217-722-6515 jbensken@illinois.edu

Locations
United States, Illinois
Beckman Institute - Biomedical Imaging Center Recruiting
Urbana, Illinois, United States, 61801
Campus Recreation Center East Recruiting
Urbana, Illinois, United States, 61801
Department of Kinesiology and Community Health Recruiting
Urbana, Illinois, United States, 61801
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Recruiting
Urbana, Illinois, United States, 61801
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Arthur F Kramer, PhD University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Principal Investigator: Charles Hillman, PhD University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  More Information

Additional Information:
No publications provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Additional publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
Responsible Party: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01619826     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: HD069381, R01HD069381-01A1
Study First Received: June 12, 2012
Last Updated: August 25, 2014
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Keywords provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign:
physical activity
fitness
brain health
cognition
scholastic achievement
preadolescent children

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 20, 2014