Effectiveness of a Novel Warm-up in Decreasing Risk Factors for ACL Injury in Female Youth Soccer Players

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of British Columbia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01591941
First received: May 2, 2012
Last updated: May 3, 2012
Last verified: May 2012
  Purpose

There is a large number of young women who sustain serious knee injuries from playing soccer. Female athletes are at high risk of knee injuries from soccer than males. We will conduct a research project to assess the effect of a warm-up on changing some of the movement patterns thought to contribute to these serious knee injuries.

It is hypothesized that a core position and control movement strategy (Core-PAC) group reduce biomechanical risk factors at the knee compared to a control after the training program.


Condition Intervention Phase
ACL Injury
Other: Core-PAC
Phase 2

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Endpoint Classification: Safety/Efficacy Study
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: The Effectiveness of a Novel Warm-up in Decreasing Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in Female Youth Soccer Players

Further study details as provided by University of British Columbia:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Peak knee flexion angle and peak abduction moment [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]

    Intervention group will be instructed to move from the trunk first during a series of athletic tasks. The Control group will be instructed to move with their usual athletic movements during the same tasks.

    After 6 weeks of this training, subjects will be asked to return to the GF Strong Rehabilitation Center for biomechanical testing.



Enrollment: 20
Study Start Date: June 2006
Study Completion Date: August 2007
Primary Completion Date: August 2007 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: CON group
Control Group underwent a standard soccer warm-up
Other: Core-PAC

Core position and control movement strategy (Core-PAC):

Do warm-up prior to 6 weeks of regular soccer training for peak flexion angles and peak abduction moments at the knee during a side-cut (SC) and an unanticipated side-cut (USC) prior to kicking a soccer ball and a side-hop (SH) task.

Experimental: Core-PAC
Experimental took part in the Core position and control movement strategy (Core-PAC) warm-up
Other: Core-PAC

Core position and control movement strategy (Core-PAC):

Do warm-up prior to 6 weeks of regular soccer training for peak flexion angles and peak abduction moments at the knee during a side-cut (SC) and an unanticipated side-cut (USC) prior to kicking a soccer ball and a side-hop (SH) task.


Detailed Description:

There is a large number of young women who sustain serious knee injuries from playing soccer. Female athletes are at high risk of knee injuries from soccer than males. We will conduct a research project to assess the effect of a warm-up on changing some of the movement patterns thought to contribute to these serious knee injuries.

A core position and control movement strategy (Core-PAC) may be one method of modifying high-risk movements such as side-cutting. The Core-PAC is a simple method of getting the centre of mass (COM) closer to the plant foot or base of support (BOS). Moving the COM closer to the BOS may bias joint loading to the sagittal rather than the frontal and transverse planes, which often occurs in female athletes and poses a risk for ACL injury.

In this study, we will conduct a randomized controlled trial to compare a Core-PAC trained group to a control group for peak flexion angles and peak abduction moments at the knee during a side-cut and an unanticipated side-cut prior to kicking a soccer ball and a side-hop task after a six-week training program.

It is hypothesized that a Core-PAC group would have greater peak flexion angles and lower peak abduction moments at the knee compared to a control after the training program.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   14 Years to 17 Years
Genders Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 14-17 years of age;
  • have no injuries for six weeks prior to testing;
  • have no medical problems preventing them from participating in the study.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • have a previous ACL injury or repair;
  • have a back or lower limb injury that kept them from playing or training for greater than 30 days in the past year;
  • presently using a supplemental exercise based program;
  • have any medical or neurologic condition that would impair their ability to perform the tasks.
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01591941

Locations
Canada, British Columbia
Rehab Research Lab, GF Strong Rehab Centre
Vancovuer, British Columbia, Canada, V5Z 2G9
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of British Columbia
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Suan R Harris, PhD University of British Columbia
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: University of British Columbia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01591941     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: BCM06-0007
Study First Received: May 2, 2012
Last Updated: May 3, 2012
Health Authority: Canada: Health Canada

Keywords provided by University of British Columbia:
ACL, Knee , Injury,

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 16, 2014