Blue Wavelength Light-blocking Glasses in ADHD-Insomnia

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Rachel Fargason, MD, University of Alabama at Birmingham
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01557595
First received: February 16, 2012
Last updated: September 5, 2014
Last verified: September 2014
  Purpose

Patients with ADHD often report staying up late on the computer, watching TV, or using other electronic devices, all strong emitters of blue light which may be contributing to the delayed sleep onset times seen in some of these patients. Evening use of polarizing glasses which filter out blue light may decrease the contribution of environmental light late at night to delayed bedtime. This is a treatment that Dr. Fargason uses when patients do not want to use sleep medication to help them fall asleep. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of this treatment by use of sleep diaries and sleep questionnaires.


Condition Intervention
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Delayed Sleep Phase Type Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorder
Device: Polarized glasses designed to filter out blue light

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Evening Use of Polarized Glasses Designed to Filter Out Blue Light in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder - Delayed Circadian Rhythm Disorder Patients

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by University of Alabama at Birmingham:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) at 2 Weeks After Baseline [ Time Frame: Change from baseline in PSQI at 2 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    The PSQI is a validated self-rating instrument assessing aspects of sleep quality.Minimum score 0 (better); maximum score 21 (worse) < or = 5 associated with good sleep quality; > 5 associated with poor sleep quality. The PSQI is considered appropriate in identifying "new-onset" insomnia in the clinical setting.


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Wake Up and Bedtime Diaries [ Time Frame: Change from baseline in diaries at 2 weeks ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
    At the screen visit, participants will receive 7 sets of Wake Up and Bedtime Diaries and be instructed to complete them twice daily. At the baseline visit, the completed diaries will be retrieved, and participants will be given 14 sets of Wake Up and Bedtime Diaries. Participants will also be given the polarized glasses to wear from sundown until bedtime for 2 weeks. Diaries will be filled out daily for 2 weeks. All forms will be collected with the glasses after the 2 weeks, at the termination visit.


Enrollment: 22
Study Start Date: September 2011
Study Completion Date: June 2012
Primary Completion Date: June 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Adults with ADHD
Participants will be given polarized glasses (yellow "sun"- glasses) which filter out blue light to wear only from sundown until bedtime for two weeks. Subjects will 19 years or older and have ADHD
Device: Polarized glasses designed to filter out blue light
Participants will be given polarized glasses (yellow "sun"- glasses) which filter out blue light to wear only from sundown until bedtime for two weeks. They will be instructed to turn off fluorescent lights and only use household lamps for evening activities. They will be instructed not to drive while wearing the glasses. In addition to the oral instructions, they will also be given a written "Instruction Sheet." Any oral insomnia agent will be held throughout the study, otherwise they are to follow their usual evening routines. This is an alternative treatment already in use in Dr. Fargason's practice for those patients who don't want to take sleep medications. This research focuses on the effectiveness of this treatment and involves questionnaires to do so.
Other Name: Lowbluelights.com eyewear

Detailed Description:

Blue light in the 460-480 nm range is known to suppress melatonin onset and signal alerting mechanisms in the brain. Patients with ADHD often report staying up late on the computer, watching TV, or using other electronic devices, all strong emitters of blue light which may be contributing to the delayed sleep onset times seen in these patients. (Ramelteon for insomnia due to ADHD, R Fargason, K Gamble, K Avis, R Besing, R May, Psychopharmacology Bulletin, submitted March 2011). Dr. Fargason is using polarized glasses to treat patients who do not want to take sleep medications to facilitate earlier sleep onset.

At the screen visit, following the informed consent procedure, ADHD + Delayed CRSD participants will fill out the demographic sheet and will be interviewed by the investigator regarding their history of sleep medications. If they are currently taking sleep medications and wish to stop taking them in order to participate in the study, they will be instructed how to safely do this. Following a two week washout period, participants will be given 7 wake up and bedtime diaries to complete. If the participant has not been on sleep medications for the last two weeks, they will receive the 7 sets of diaries at the screen visit and instructed to complete them twice daily.

At the baseline visit, the diaries will be retrieved. The participants will complete a baseline Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and will be given 14 sets of wake up and bedtime diaries. Participants will also be given polarized glasses which filter out blue light to wear only from sundown until bedtime for two weeks. They will be instructed to turn off fluorescent lights and only use household lamps for evening activities. They will be instructed not to drive while wearing the glasses. In addition to the oral instructions, they will also be given a written "Instruction Sheet." Any oral insomnia agent will be held throughout the study, otherwise they are to follow their usual evening routines. This is an alternative treatment already in use in Dr. Fargason's practice for those patients who don't want to take sleep medications. This research focuses on the effectiveness of this treatment and involves questionnaires to do so.

The diaries will then be filled out daily for 2 weeks; days with extenuating circumstances (i.e. nighttime trip to ER) will be noted; the PSQI will be filled out again at the 2 week termination visit. All forms will be collected with the glasses at the 2 week visit. This data is being gathered in patients who have remained in clinical treatment with Dr. Fargason and view this as an opportunity to have a free trial of the polarizing glasses before purchasing them for their own use to advance their sleep phase. This idea was prompted by the patients' eagerness to try the glasses clinically and hence avoid need for sleep medication.

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   19 Years and older
Genders Eligible for Study:   Both
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 19 years of age and older
  • Diagnosis of ADHD and DCRD
  • Willingness to sign consent and participate in the study

Exclusion Criteria:

  • No sleep medication for previous two weeks before screen visit (Can enroll if willing to undergo washout period)
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01557595

Locations
United States, Alabama
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Birmingham, Alabama, United States, 35294
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Alabama at Birmingham
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Rachel Fargason, MD University of Alabama at Birmingham
  More Information

No publications provided

Responsible Party: Rachel Fargason, MD, MD, Associate Professor Psychiatry, University of Alabama at Birmingham
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01557595     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: X110825016
Study First Received: February 16, 2012
Results First Received: April 8, 2014
Last Updated: September 5, 2014
Health Authority: United States: Institutional Review Board

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Disease
Hyperkinesis
Parasomnias
Sleep Disorders
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
Chronobiology Disorders
Dyskinesias
Dyssomnias
Mental Disorders
Mental Disorders Diagnosed in Childhood
Nervous System Diseases
Neurologic Manifestations
Occupational Diseases
Pathologic Processes
Signs and Symptoms

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on October 22, 2014